This article appeared in The Intellectual Property Strategist, an ALM/Law Journal Newsletters publication that provides a practical source of both business and litigation tactics in the fast-changing area of intellectual property law, including litigating IP rights, patent damages, venue and infringement issues, inter partes review, trademarks on social media – and more.

The U.S. Supreme Court just crashed the copyright world’s latest dance party — stepping on the toes of a soiree of copyright infringement lawsuits against videogame developer Epic Games, the creator of Fortnite. For months, a growing group of plaintiffs, including Alfonso Ribeiro, otherwise known as the self-confident yet naive character “Carlton Banks” from TV’s The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, raised claims that Fortnite was using popular dance moves without the permission of the artists who popularized them.

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