The California Department of Fair Employment and Housing has requested more than a half million dollars in attorney fees from the Law School Admission Council for its work related to the LSAT developer’s violations of a consent decree.

A federal judge in March held the council in civil contempt for violating the court-ordered rules governing accommodations for disabled test takers—a development the California department set in motion last fall when it filed court papers detailing what it alleged were the council’s efforts to circumvent the 2014 consent decree. U.S. District Judge Joseph Spero of the Northern District of California extended the consent decree, which was set to expire in May, for two more years as a result. Spero also ordered the council to pay for the department’s fees and costs. (The council denied any intentional violations, saying it tried to operate within the complicated and costly set of best practices established under the consent decree. The council also said it quickly corrected compliance problems identified by the California department.)

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