Committing a sex offense can ruin two lives—the victim’s and the offender’s. For the offender, the result can be significant incarceration time and financial penalties. In all states, persons convicted of certain crimes are required to register on a sex offender registry. The registry is viewable by the general public, thereby allowing people to view the photo and current address of the registrant, as well as information regarding the crime that was committed by the registrant. Recently, the regulations of the federal Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act were updated. In addition to the obvious baseline data, the registrant must now provide information about their professional licenses and vehicles, as well as other personal information.

Originally conceived as a tool to help protect local community residents, registration can potentially affect the registrant’s employment opportunities, personal relationships, and their ability to simply live undisturbed without fear of being harassed. However morally reprehensible a registrant be viewed, family members and partners of the offender are also affected.

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