Brett M. McCartney. Brett M. McCartney.

In one of the most anticipated opinions of 2017, Delaware’s Supreme Court reversed the Court of Chancery’s appraisal decision valuing Dell, Inc.’s shares after its management-led buyout in 2013.  In its unanimous en banc decision, the Supreme Court ruled that the Court of Chancery abused its discretion by relying exclusively on its own discounted cash flow (DCF) analysis while affording no weight to the transaction price when valuing the company’s shares at the time of its 2013 going-private merger. So, consistent with its recent decision in DFC Global v. Muirfield Value Partners, the Supreme Court provided context where a deal price should represent strong evidence of fair value.

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