More law schools are beginning to offer students the opportunity to participate in online courses, potentially allowing candidates facing geographical or employment-related barriers to pursue a legal education and—eventually—a legal career.

But there may be another unexpected fringe benefit awaiting those students once graduation rolls around. The shift toward online coursework also complements a larger, industry-agnostic trend toward remote working and virtual offices, which requires employees to be fluent in digital communication skills and possess an ability to work independently.

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