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WHAT WE’RE WATCHING

 

VOICES - The Black Law Students Association at Columbia is calling for the school to fire a lecturer who was a key prosecutor in the Central Park Five case. Karen Sloan reports that a new Netflix miniseries based on the wrongful convictions of five minority boys for a 1989 rape they didn’t commit prompted the law student group to demand the dismissal of lecturer Elizabeth Lederer, who helped prosecute the case. Lederer has not spoken publicly about the miniseries, but Linda Fairstein, a co-prosecutor on the case, wrote in a Wall Street Journal op-ed on Monday that there was good reason to believe the boys were guilty of the crime.

VOTE - The House Oversight and Reform Committee is expected to vote today on whether to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt for refusing to comply with subpoenas concerning documents relating to the Trump administration’s efforts to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

CHEAP LABOR - The robots are coming after sexual harassers. Victoria Hudgins reports that e-discovery providers are releasing technology specifically designed to help corporate clients with harassment investigations. One new product searches social media platforms and other websites and captures, preserves and archives evidence in its native format. Legal departments say the technology is faster and cheaper than hiring outside counsel to do it.


EDITOR’S PICKS

 

Sidley and Willkie Find Refuge as Crash Keeps NY Offices Closed

Lawyers Want Brad as a Client. Latoya? No Thanks!

UCLA Latest School Hit by Doctor’s Sex Scandal

Greenberg Traurig Can’t Dodge $1.3M Suit Over ‘Gotti’ Film Financing

Liftoff for UPS’s Drone Program: A Q&A With General Counsel Norman Brothers


WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING

 

GONE - U.K.-based Ashurst has let go a Munich partner and member of its global board over a conduct issue. Rose Walker reports that the firm announced the departure of finance and banking partner Bernd Egbers, stating that it was a “result of conduct which is contrary to our values. There is no connection with any client or client matter.”


WHAT YOU SAID

“We find evidence that individuals at the top of the profession with expertise and revenue are discriminating on multiple fronts because they can.”

— BRIAN LIBGOBER, LECTURER AT YALE UNIVERSITY, WHOSE STUDY FOUND THAT HIGH-END LAWYERS WITH THRIVING PRACTICES ARE MORE LIKELY TO SHOW RACIAL BIAS WHEN CHOOSING CLIENTS THAN LAWYERS OF MORE MODERATE MEANS.