Irwin Raij and Chuck Baker of O'Melveny & Myers. When sports teams change hands, Proskauer Rose’s Joe Leccese and O’Melveny & Myers’ Chuck Baker and Irwin Raij are on the short list of go-to lawyers.
Leccese’s first work on an NFL ownership transition came in 1984, when he helped Jeffrey Lurie buy the Philadelphia Eagles for $185 million. Baker and Raij, between them, have represented the buyers of the Los Angeles Dodgers, the sellers of the Atlanta Hawks and the former owners of the Milwaukee Bucks, among others. So it wasn’t a surprise that the trio worked on opposite sides of last year’s sale of the NFL’s Carolina Panthers. The shock was that the franchise was up for sale in the first place. The team was put on the block following a Sports Illustrated report alleging owner Jerry Richardson had sexually harassed women on the team’s staff. That put the lawyers on both sides of the deal under tremendous time pressure and increased public scrutiny on the deal.
Leccese got the call from Panthers ownership thanks to an existing relationship. He had represented the team since 2010, including on a stadium renovation. Baker and Raij were introduced to billionaire investor David Tepper as a result of his interest in bidding on the team. The trio made a fast connection following an in-person meeting in Florida, and they were off to the races.
A team of 32 O’Melveny attorneys guided Tepper from his winning bid to closing within 60 days. In the end, the deal closed with a record sum for a professional sports team: $2.275 billion.
“People like to use the expression ‘win-win,’” Leccese says, “but it looks like it did turn out well for the buyer, the seller group and the community.”—Roy Strom
Scott Barshay of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison. Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison partner Scott Barshay has a maxim when advising companies on significant purchases: “Speed is your friend, and time is your enemy.”
That adage guided IBM’s $34 billion purchase of open source software company Red Hat Inc. Announced in October 2018, it was the largest-ever acquisition of a software company, IBM’s biggest acquisition to date, and the third-largest ever in the technology sector.
The company was wary of three other reputed suitors for Red Hat. Consequently, only four weeks elapsed between the opening of negotiations and signing the all-cash agreement. The average time from offer to signing for announced cash deals over $10 billion in 2018 was, in contrast, 21 weeks.
The prospect of leaks was also a concern, mandating small teams on both sides. And the firm also had to help IBM arrange $20 billion in financing for the deal.
“There was a lot more to get done than usual, in a much shorter amount of time, with many fewer people,” Barshay says.
The key, he adds, was preparation: thinking through the process from the beginning and weighing all the potential variables. Long-term relationships also helped. Barshay has worked with IBM’s general counsel for a dozen years, and with the lawyers on the deal team for two decades.
“Being able to get the deal done quickly and get it done right is a testament to IBM’s deal-making prowess from both a legal and business standpoint,” Barshay concludes.—Dan Packel
Ronit Berkovich and Marcia Goldstein of Weil, Gotshal & Manges. Marcia Goldstein and Ronit Berkovich first worked together in 2002, after Berkovich, a disgruntled corporate attorney in Boston, reached out to her Harvard bankruptcy professor, Elizabeth Warren, seeking a change in her circumstances. The senator and presidential hopeful called Goldstein, and soon Berkovich had joined Weil, Gotshal & Manges in Manhattan, just weeks before the WorldCom bankruptcy, at the time the largest ever, came in the door. Years later, they again found themselves working closely on another mammoth undertaking: the global restructuring of Takata Corp., scarred by the largest automotive recall in history, which allowed for a $1.6 billion sale of the company’s assets to Key Safety Systems.
“We were able to save the company and preserve thousands of jobs, something that was not a certain outcome from the beginning,” Berkovich says.
The sale depended on the successful resolution of bankruptcy proceedings in the United States and Japan, along with an out-of-court settlement in Europe and a connected Canadian case. To ensure approval, Takata had to satisfy the demands of the auto manufacturers that shouldered the costs of replacing faulty airbags, as well as plaintiffs who had sustained injuries. The after-effects of federal investigations and state lawsuits added to the complexity of the matter. There was also time pressure to resolve both insolvency proceedings in time for the sale deadline.
“It took a long time to get to court, but once in court, it was only 10 months for a case of that magnitude,” Goldstein says. “That’s something we worked hard to achieve.”—Dan Packel
Elizabeth Cooper of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett. For nearly the entire month of January 2018, Simpson Thacher & Bartlett partner Elizabeth Cooper was holed up in conference rooms at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz. Cooper and the rest of her team at the Wall Street firm were representing a Blackstone Group-led consortium that was attempting a one-of-a-kind transaction with Thomson Reuters Corp., represented by Wachtell.
The private equity firm was attempting to purchase a majority stake in Thomson Reuters’ financial and risk unit in what would become a $20 billion partnership between the two, with Blackstone acquiring 55 percent of the business. But doing so required turning every aspect of the financial and risk business into its own standalone entity, ultimately renamed Refinitiv.
“There were so many different work streams involved and so many people at Simpson working on some of the key components, so for me the biggest challenge was really keeping all of the pieces moving,” says Cooper, who went on to work with Blackstone on four more deals in 2018.
For three straight weeks, Cooper attended in-person negotiations with lawyers and senior management of Blackstone and Thomson Reuters, hashing out an agreement that involved negotiating governance arrangements, warrant agreements, and regulatory and antitrust approvals.
But spending time at the negotiating table with her clients and being able to understand what their focus and goals were made all the difference, Cooper says.
“I understood what they were looking for in this partnership, and they were so excited about this deal,” Cooper says. “I really dug in.”—Meghan Tribe
Howard Ellin of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. Faiza Saeed, George Schoen and Howard Ellin have seen their share of complicated deals. But with interloping bids, a spinoff and a need to divest assets to secure regulatory approval, they discovered novel layers of complexity in The Walt Disney Co.’s $71.3 billion acquisition of 21st Century Fox Inc.
“One of the keys to handling all of the complexities, especially in an extremely condensed time frame, was to anticipate what each functional area would need to accomplish to bring the deal together, and make sure we were all in sync,” says Cravath’s Schoen, who represented Disney on the deal alongside Saeed.
For the Cravath duo, speed and agility were key. After Disney made an initial offer to buy Fox in an all-stock transaction valued around $52 billion, Comcast Corp. entered the fray with a $65 billion cash offer, requiring Cravath to pivot and structure a new offer from Disney that would outbid Comcast while also accounting for assets such as Fox News that would have to be spun off into a new entity to get the deal done. Equally important to completing the deal was Ellin, on the Fox side, who helmed a Skadden team that had to balance not just the proposed Disney acquisition, but also a separate bidding war between Fox and Comcast for the U.K. broadcast network Sky.
For Ellin, an important piece of getting the Disney-Fox deal done was to set the battle for Sky to one side. The focus had to be on crafting an acquisition of Fox that would pass muster.
“The idea that you would have interlopers at different levels and two winners is not exactly the expected outcome,” he says.—Scott Flaherty

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Adam Emmerich of Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz. This isn’t the first time that Adam O. Emmerich has tried to guide longtime client T-Mobile US Inc. and its parent company, Deutsche Telekom AG, in a merger with another carrier. But after on-again, off-again talks with Sprint and its parent, SoftBank Corp., T–Mobile’s $26.5 billion merger with Sprint may happen.
Emmerich, a partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York, says T-Mobile and Sprint had been “dating on and off for a long time.” The merger agreement was announced in April 2018 and was awaiting antitrust approval at press time from the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission. Nevertheless, the lawyering to get the deal to this point was significant.
“We are very confident and hopeful the transaction will close,” Emmerich says, noting that his clients believe the deal will accelerate the delivery of 5G across the United States.
Emmerich says one big challenge was combining two public companies with majority shareholders: Germany’s Deutsche and Japan’s SoftBank. Deutsche also wanted the rights of a controlling stockholder in the combined company.
Ultimately, they worked out a structure giving Deutsche majority control of the new company with a proxy to vote certain SoftBank shares.
Additionally, both companies had significant and complex outstanding debt. Emmerich and a Wachtell team negotiated an unusual minimum credit rating closing condition, and he also arranged for a $38 billion standby financing commitment to provide liquidity to the new company. He also led negotiations on a provision to protect the parties during the regulatory approval process, because the deal does not include a regulatory termination fee.—Brenda Sapino Jeffreys
Ross Kwasteniet and Anup Sathy of Kirkland & Ellis. When deepwater drilling contractor Seadrill Ltd., facing $20 billion in obligations, recognized that it had to undergo a restructuring, it was imperative that the company’s operations remain unscathed.
“They operate these drill ships and rigs that are hundreds of feet long and have dozens of people on them and operate in some of the harshest environments in the world,” says Kirkland & Ellis partner Anup Sathy.
Consequently, Seadrill’s employees needed to know that they would be protected and supported, while customers needed to count on continuing to receive high-quality services.
Seadrill had operations—and creditors—worldwide, and Sathy and Kirkland colleague Ross Kwasteniet spent a year evaluating the options for restructuring before electing to enter Chapter 11 in the United States. Before doing so, it was necessary to get creditors on board.
“We needed everybody to agree on a format,” Sathy says.
By working around the clock, the Kirkland team was able to complete the process in roughly seven months.
“We had a team in Europe, in the U.S. and in Asia,” Sathy says. “At the end of their day Europe passed to the U.S., and at the end of their day, the U.S. passed to Asia.”
Transparency was also critical, so that creditors in Africa and Asia, who might have been unfamiliar with the ends of Chapter 11, were kept on board.
“In a world of technology, where you can do everything by phone and email, we were on planes a lot, we were face-to-face a lot,” Sathy says. “You accomplish a lot when you can see someone in person.”—Dan Packel
Joe Leccese of Proskauer Rose. When sports teams change hands, Proskauer Rose’s Joe Leccese and O’Melveny & Myers’ Chuck Baker and Irwin Raij are on the short list of go-to lawyers.
Leccese’s first work on an NFL ownership transition came in 1984, when he helped Jeffrey Lurie buy the Philadelphia Eagles for $185 million. Baker and Raij, between them, have represented the buyers of the Los Angeles Dodgers, the sellers of the Atlanta Hawks and the former owners of the Milwaukee Bucks, among others.
So it wasn’t a surprise that the trio worked on opposite sides of last year’s sale of the NFL’s Carolina Panthers. The shock was that the franchise was up for sale in the first place. The team was put on the block following a Sports Illustrated report alleging owner Jerry Richardson had sexually harassed women on the team’s staff. That put the lawyers on both sides of the deal under tremendous time pressure and increased public scrutiny on the deal.
Leccese got the call from Panthers ownership thanks to an existing relationship. He had represented the team since 2010, including on a stadium renovation. Baker and Raij were introduced to billionaire investor David Tepper as a result of his interest in bidding on the team. The trio made a fast connection following an in-person meeting in Florida, and they were off to the races.
A team of 32 O’Melveny attorneys guided Tepper from his winning bid to closing within 60 days. In the end, the deal closed with a record sum for a professional sports team: $2.275 billion.
“People like to use the expression ‘win-win,’” Leccese says, “but it looks like it did turn out well for the buyer, the seller group and the community.”—Roy Strom
Kai Liekefett of Sidley Austin. As one of a handful of law firm partners across the country focused exclusively on shareholder activism issues, Sidley Austin’s Kai Liekefett spends the vast majority of his time advising corporate boards on ways to deal with demands from activist investors.
He took a different kind of role, however, as counsel to Elaine Wynn during her quest to begin a new chapter at the company she co-founded, Wynn Resorts Ltd., following sexual misconduct allegations against her ex-husband and the company’s former CEO, casino mogul Steve Wynn. Liekefett guided Elaine Wynn in her pursuit of a proxy contest aimed at ousting a member of the Wynn Resorts board of directors whom she thought was too passive when complaints about Steve Wynn were first raised within the company. In light of its connections to the #MeToo movement, the proxy fight attracted intense media attention.
“We wanted to have a referendum on the legacy board members who allowed this to happen—Steve Wynn running wild, while the board looks the other way,” Liekefett says.
But getting to the point where Elaine Wynn could mount the battle in the first place required creative solutions on Liekefett’s part. Due to a rapidly approaching annual meeting, he first had to convince the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to expedite its review of the proxy contest, convincing the agency to waive the minimum review period of 10 days.
Wynn ultimately got her way, and then some.
“The campaign turned out to be extraordinarily successful,” Liekefett says. “The shareholder support for Elaine Wynn was so massive that not just one but two directors of Wynn Resorts resigned before the annual meeting.”—Scott Flaherty
Anthony McCusker of Goodwin Procter. As co-chair of Goodwin Procter’s technology practice, Anthony McCusker has handled more than his fair share of IPOs and corporate acquisitions.
But his representation last year of software company Qualtrics International Inc. brought a new twist for the 20-year veteran of Silicon Valley’s corporate law practice: It was, in effect, both an IPO and an acquisition. Qualtrics was one of the most highly anticipated public offerings of 2018, and McCusker and a team of lawyers, including partner Bradley Weber, got the call. McCusker had represented the Salt Lake City-based company since 2011, when the growing business came to Silicon Valley for meetings with potential professional services help.
Following months of work on the IPO in the summer and fall, McCusker was one of the first people to be informed by the company’s CEO that German giant SAP SE had submitted a bid to acquire the business, which makes experience management software. He got that news one month before the IPO was set to price. So he brought together a second team of M&A lawyers to get to work on the SAP bid as quickly as possible. Complicating that effort was the need to comply with a recently bulked-up regulatory environment for foreign companies purchasing U.S. businesses.
McCusker’s team was among the first to successfully navigate the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act. The deal closed three days before the company was set to float on the public markets and one day before it was set to file pricing details for its shares. The purchase price was $8 billion.
“The world would have had a better understanding of where we were on the [IPO] valuation if we were a day later,” McCusker says.—Roy Strom (Photo: Jason Doiy/ALM)

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Inosi Nyatta of Sullivan & Cromwell. Several years ago, Sullivan & Cromwell client Cheniere Energy Inc. was thinking about developing its second liquefied natural gas project in Corpus Christi, Texas. But when the market started to turn and oil prices started to dip in 2015, the Houston-based company decided to postpone the development of one piece of the project.
“We continued to work with them through the dip in the market prices to help them think about how to optimally position the expansion when they eventually went to the market,” says Sullivan & Cromwell financing and restructuring partner Inosi Nyatta, who is co-head of the firm’s project development and finance practice.
So when Cheniere decided at the beginning of 2018 to move forward with the three-train liquefaction project, it was off to the races to secure the financing.
But the project financing market had vastly changed. Buyers and sellers were looking at the LNG market quite differently, and traditional long-term contract models and point-to-point sales were no longer the norm. “Lenders are generally a little bit behind the curve in really accepting the risks of a new, changing market,” Nyatta says.
Nyatta and her team worked to explain the changing dynamic to lenders and develop new structures within the financing to reflect some of the risks that the new market dynamic created. They ensured that lenders’ concerns were adequately mitigated to allow Cheniere to buy the financing that was needed.
By May 2018, Cheniere had the $6.1 billion in expansion financing necessary for its Corpus Christi liquefaction project thanks to a new financing structure that is now the precedent for other LNG projects to come.—Meghan Tribe
Will Pearce of Davis Polk & Wardwell. For Davis Polk & Wardwell's Thomas Reid and Will Pearce, trans-Atlantic coordination helped guide client Comcast Corp. through a rare weekend auction held by the U.K. Panel on Takeovers and Mergers. Reid says one of the challenges stemmed from an existing takeover bid by 21st Century Fox Inc., which already owned a 39 percent stake in Sky by the time Comcast opted to make a standalone offer.
“We’re 39-to-nil down and our game, at least, hasn’t even started,” Reid says of the situation.
But Comcast caught up after receiving U.K. regulatory clearance in short order, then entered a bidding war against Fox. As it wore on, Reid says, a focus became convincing the U.K. Takeover Panel to set up an auction process in which Comcast and Fox could bid against one another over a tight period of time. Ultimately, Reid and Pearce guided the panel toward a weekend auction, when the markets tend to be quiet, because of the enormous scrutiny the deal had attracted from the market, particularly from hedge funds.
Reid notes the importance of Pearce’s work on the other side of the Atlantic, which included leading the way for Comcast’s dealings with the Takeover Panel. That on-the-ground expertise was ever more critical because Davis Polk has a relatively small London office.
“Will never put a foot wrong, even though so much of what we did in this case was novel, including the auction at the very end,” Reid says.—Scott Flaherty
Holly Fechner and Mark Plotkin of Covington & Burling. Covington & Burling has handled public policy work for Qualcomm Inc. for more than a decade, but in late 2017, the San Diego-based chip maker approached partner Holly Fechner, alerting her of a hostile takeover bid by Singapore-based Broadcom Ltd., the largest takeover attempt ever in the semiconductor industry. Qualcomm was facing the prospect of losing control of the company in a proxy fight launched by Broadcom in an effort to get Qualcomm to accept its $121 billion takeover bid.
Given that a foreign entity was attempting to take control of a critical technology company, Fechner brought in partners David Fagan and Mark Plotkin and notified the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States of the transaction.
But the situation—and strategy—was unprecedented.
“CFIUS, in its current form, has been around since 1988, and in all those years, with the authority to review foreign acquisitions of control of U.S. businesses, never has one of those ever involved a proxy fight,” Plotkin says.
On the eve of the shareholder vote in March, CFIUS sided with Covington and issued an interim protection order delaying the vote. One week later, President Donald Trump issued a final order prohibiting Broadcom’s pursuit.
“When you do something for the first time like this you hope to get it right and you hope that the government gets it right as a matter of public policy, but you never know for sure until you actually get the result,” Fagan says.—Meghan Tribe
Thomas Reid of Davis Polk & Wardwell. For Davis Polk & Wardwell's Thomas Reid and Will Pearce, trans-Atlantic coordination helped guide client Comcast Corp. through a rare weekend auction held by the U.K. Panel on Takeovers and Mergers. Reid says one of the challenges stemmed from an existing takeover bid by 21st Century Fox Inc., which already owned a 39 percent stake in Sky by the time Comcast opted to make a standalone offer.
“We’re 39-to-nil down and our game, at least, hasn’t even started,” Reid says of the situation.
But Comcast caught up after receiving U.K. regulatory clearance in short order, then entered a bidding war against Fox. As it wore on, Reid says, a focus became convincing the U.K. Takeover Panel to set up an auction process in which Comcast and Fox could bid against one another over a tight period of time. Ultimately, Reid and Pearce guided the panel toward a weekend auction, when the markets tend to be quiet, because of the enormous scrutiny the deal had attracted from the market, particularly from hedge funds.
Reid notes the importance of Pearce’s work on the other side of the Atlantic, which included leading the way for Comcast’s dealings with the Takeover Panel. That on-the-ground expertise was ever more critical because Davis Polk has a relatively small London office.
“Will never put a foot wrong, even though so much of what we did in this case was novel, including the auction at the very end,” Reid says.—Scott Flaherty
Greg Rodgers of Latham & Watkins. When Spotify hired Latham & Watkins corporate and capital markets partner Greg Rodgers, the streaming music service wanted to go public, but it wasn’t interested in a traditional underwritten initial public offering. Rodgers and a team from Latham devised a way to take Spotify public in April 2018 through a direct listing, a method that allowed the company to offer liquidity to existing shareholders, provide equal access to all buyers and sellers involved in the direct listing, and offer transparency and a market-driven trading price.
“The client came to us with the idea, and it was on us,” Rodgers says. “One way to describe this in a nutshell is the democratization of the process.”
It took Rodgers and his team nearly a year to develop the direct-listing structure. Three or four months were devoted to discussions with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, he says, and the team also worked through a number of issues with the New York Stock Exchange, because its listing rules didn’t quite apply. The process worked for Spotify, Rodgers says, because it wanted to go public but didn’t need to raise money. Through the direct listing, shareholders sold their shares to the public rather than Spotify issuing new shares.
Rodgers declined to say if other clients have hired him for a direct listing, but he acknowledged “enormous interest” in the structure.
“For the right company—in particular for the right prelisting owners of the right company—it makes a ton of sense,” he says.—Brenda Sapino Jeffreys

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Charles Rule of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison. When Cigna Corp. announced its planned acquisition of Express Scripts in March 2018, the regulatory environment wasn’t particularly favorable for vertical transactions. It was just after the U.S. Department of Justice’s antitrust division sued to block the AT&T/Time Warner merger, and only a year after proposed health insurer mergers between Cigna and insurer Anthem Insurance Companies Inc., and Aetna Inc. and Humana, fell apart after the DOJ sued to block them.
That posed a challenge for Charles F. “Rick” Rule and his team from Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, but he was able to close the $67 billion acquisition for Cigna by December. Rule, a co-chair of Paul Weiss’ antitrust practice and a former head of the DOJ’s antitrust division, had a long list of deals under his belt and a consistent story from his client to tell: the deal would benefit consumers.
The acquisition provides Cigna with a leading pharmacy benefit manager, Express Scripts, in a vertical integration. Rule says the focus was getting the transaction through quickly, so the legal team engaged with antitrust regulators from a very early point, and ultimately produced more than two million documents over six months.
“To the extent we had issues, we could respond to them very quickly,” he says.
It helped that he could say that his client was doing the deal for all the right reasons, he says.
Rule was pleased that Cigna’s acquisition won regulatory approval in less time than CVS Health’s acquisition of Aetna, which was a similar vertical acquisition announced three months earlier.
“That made the client pretty happy,” Rule says.—Brenda Sapino Jeffreys
Faiza Saeed and George Schoen of Cravath, Swaine & Moore. Faiza Saeed, George Schoen and Howard Ellin have seen their share of complicated deals. But with interloping bids, a spinoff and a need to divest assets to secure regulatory approval, they discovered novel layers of complexity in The Walt Disney Co.’s $71.3 billion acquisition of 21st Century Fox Inc.
“One of the keys to handling all of the complexities, especially in an extremely condensed time frame, was to anticipate what each functional area would need to accomplish to bring the deal together, and make sure we were all in sync,” says Cravath, Swaine & Moore’s Schoen, who represented Disney on the deal alongside Saeed.
For the Cravath duo, speed and agility were key. After Disney made an initial offer to buy Fox in an all-stock transaction valued around $52 billion, Comcast Corp. entered the fray with a $65 billion cash offer, requiring Cravath to pivot and structure a new offer from Disney that would outbid Comcast while also accounting for assets such as Fox News that would have to be spun off into a new entity to get the deal done.
Equally important to completing the deal was Ellin, on the Fox side, who helmed a Skadden team that had to balance not just the proposed Disney acquisition, but also a separate bidding war between Fox and Comcast for the U.K. broadcast network Sky.
For Ellin, an important piece of getting the Disney-Fox deal done was to set the battle for Sky to one side. The focus had to be on crafting an acquisition of Fox that would pass muster.
“The idea that you would have interlopers at different levels and two winners is not exactly the expected outcome,” he says.—Scott Flaherty
Will Shields and Tsuyoshi Imai of Ropes & Gray. At times, it must have felt like half the world was conspiring against Ropes & Gray partners Tsuyoshi Imai and Will Shields and their longtime client Bain Capital in its attempt to acquire Toshiba Memory Corp.
Japanese regulators were adverse to a foreign entity buying the country’s only producer of NAND memory chips, crucial for today’s smartphones and tablets. Chinese regulators, in the midst of a trade war with President Donald Trump, were reluctant. And then there were Bain’s competing bidders for Toshiba’s crown asset, the sale of which was the company’s ticket to staying out of bankruptcy.
Rival private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. teamed up to make a bid with Western Digital Corp., which already sold Toshiba’s NAND chips through a joint venture that was the basis of a Western Digital lawsuit seeking to stop Toshiba from selling to a competitor.
And yet, in the face of all this opposition, Shields says, “Nobody could afford to have this deal not happen.” He was referring, mostly, to tech companies that use NAND chips in their products. For those companies, Bain’s bid ensured more robust competition in an already small market. And so Shields, Imai and Bain pulled those companies into its bid, securing financing from Apple Inc., Dell Technologies, Seagate Technology and Kingston Technology, among others.
The deal cured the concerns of its one-time antagonists by keeping a Japanese company in the ownership group and by resolving the Western Digital lawsuit. As for China, the country’s imprimatur was the final hurdle, and it came at a time when a confidant of Chinese President Xi Jinping was in Washington discussing the trade dispute.—Roy Strom

This year’s group of Dealmakers of the Year handled an assortment of work that runs the gamut, from the sale of an NFL team to a proxy fight heavily influenced by the #MeToo movement. The work highlighted here includes mergers that will reshape industries and major IPOs, and all of it was complex and complicated in nature.