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WHAT WE’RE WATCHING

 

LIMPING ALONG - The federal judiciary is endeavoring to sustain paid operations amid the partial government shutdown through Jan. 18, pushing a closure a week beyond the original date it set when the standoff began. Michael Scarcella reportsthat the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts in an advisory has asked courts to delay or defer non-mission critical expenses, such as new hires and non-case related travel, in order to keep paying staff through the new date. The advisory said only “essential work” would continue after Jan. 18.

MOUNTING PROBLEMS - The hack by Dark Overlord—the group seeking ransom payments for pilfered data it claims is related to law firms involved in 9/11 litigation—underscores a broader problem for all law firms, which are in a unique position, Dan Packel reports. Not only are they under an obligation to their clients to protect their confidential and sensitive materials, but they also rely on service providers that might have their own vulnerabilities. “We have really now started to scratch the surface of the exposures that law firms have,” says Tom Ricketts, executive director at Aon Professional Services.

ON A ROLL - We know international law firms are rushing to Ireland to avoid practice restrictions that Brexit will bring. But how big is the push? Rowan Bennett reports that Allen & Overy admitted the most lawyers in 2018 by adding 76 to its roster in Ireland for a total of 110. Latham & Watkins boosted its numbers by 45, for a total of 92 lawyers in Ireland, while Slaughter and May increased by 30 to a total of 109. Eversheds Sutherland has the highest number of lawyers on the Irish roll, at 132.


 

EDITOR’S PICKS

 

Manhattan Lawyer Charged With Sexual Attacks on Women

Banking Nearly $2M at Covington, Kyl Rejoins Firm’s Public Policy Group

2nd Circuit Upholds Insider Trading Conviction of Ex-Goldman Sachs Director

Munger Tolles Did It. Why Can’t You?

Companies with California Employees Face New Harassment Training Requirements in 2019


 

WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING

 

PUT OFF The Singaporean government has decided to delay the renewals for five international law firms’ licenses, instead granting temporary extensions enabling their lawyers to continue practicing in the city. Anna Zhang reports that Allen & Overy; Clifford Chance; Latham & Watkins; Norton Rose Fulbright; and White & Case will have their licenses extended to 2020. The licenses for Gibson Dunn; Jones Day; Linklaters; and Sidley Austin were originally due to expire in 2018, but in late 2017, the government announced a similar two-year temporary extension because the firms’ performance was weaker than expected.


 

WHAT YOU SAID

“Firms can step up now or go there kicking and screaming.”

—  KURUVILLA OLASA, A NEW PARTNER AT MUNGER TOLLES, WHO TOOK SIX WEEKS OFF AFTER THE BIRTH OF EACH OF HIS TWO CHILDREN, COMMENTING ON HOW LAW FIRMS NEED TO ADOPT MORE  FLEXIBLE LEAVE POLICIES, LIKE THE ONE AT HIS FIRM, IN ORDER TO RETAIN TALENT.

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