10. Nearly 37 percent of students at the University of Oklahoma College of Law are not in the school’s J.D program. The Norman campus offers both an LL.M. and M.S.L. (Masters of Legal Studies) alongside the J.D.
9. New York University School of Law is known for its Tax LL.M. program and its LL.M. for international attorneys. (The school’s tax law program is ranked No. 1 in the country by U.S. News & World Report.) More than 37 percent of the school’s enrollment comes from outside the J.D. program.
8. Pepperdine University School of Law is packing in the non-J.D. students. More than 38 percent of its enrollment comes from its Masters of Dispute Resolution, its LL.M., and its online Master of Legal Studies programs.
7. Seton Hall University School of Law is a popular choice for those seeking degrees outside the J.D. More than a third of its students—38 percent—are enrolled in the school’s various LL.M. programs centered on health law and intellectual property, as well as its Master of Science in Jurisprudence program.
6. Nearly 41 percent of students at the Appalachian School of Law aren’t in the J.D. program. The school offers a Masters of Legal Studies and Juris Master, which is an abbreviated degree students can complete after three semesters.

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5. Washington University in St. Louis School of Law has 571 non-J.D. students, with more than half completing those degrees online. Altogether, non-J.D. students comprise nearly 44 percent of its student body.
4. LL.M. students are flocking to the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, where they comprise more than 49 percent of students. The Los Angeles school offers a variety of LL.M. programs, as well as a Master of Studies in Law and a Master of Dispute Resolution.
3. More than half the students at Liberty University School of Law—51 percent—aren’t pursuing a J.D. Rather, they’re in the school’s online LL.M. program for international lawyers.
2. Regent University School of Law has the second-highest percentage of non-J.D. students, at 64 percent. It offers a general LL.M.; an LL.M. for international lawyers; and an LL.M. in human rights law.
1. More than two-thirds of students at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law aren’t in its J.D. program. Nearly 78 percent are non-J.D. students. The Tucson school is unique in that it’s the only law campus currently offering a bachleor’s degree in law for undergraduates alongside a LL.M. and a Master of Legal Studies.

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Collectively, law schools are enrolling more non-J.D. students than ever before. The number of law school students who are pursuing LL.M. and masters in law degrees has doubled over the past decade. Today, 14 percent of enrolled students nationwide aren’t in J.D. programs. That figure had been inching up before 2008, but took off when the applicant pool for J.D. programs shrunk and law schools needed to find alternative ways to fill their seats and coffers. This fall, law schools enrolled 18,523 non-J.D. students, representing an 8 percent increase over 2017. Of those non-J.D. students, 5,588 were in online degree programs. Here are the 10 law schools with the highest percentage of students outside the traditional J.D. program, according to the latest figures from the American Bar Association.