Contra Costa County Superior Court located at 725 Court Street, Martinez CA (Photo: Jason Doiy/ALM) Contra Costa County Superior Court located at 725 Court Street, Martinez CA (Photo: Jason Doiy/ALM)

This list was updated on 8/13/2020 at 4:07 PM

California courts were just beginning to ease months of pandemic-related closures and then the state’s infection numbers spiked. Here’s a look at how courts across the state are grappling with all the changes associated with the novel coronavirus as of Aug. 13.

Alameda County Superior Court: Court leaders on July 10 announced that they will extend the stay on writs of possession in unlawful detainer matters to Aug. 16. The court as of July 13 began accepting unlawful detainer filings tied to public health and safety emergencies.

On June 16, the court adopted its own $0 bail emergency bail schedule. The chief justice issued a sixth emergency order for the court on June 29, authorizing court leaders to declare a holiday between June 29 and July 28 for the purposes of calculating deadlines in certain matters.

Jury trials resumed on June 8, with potential jurors receiving summonses to report on June 29. In anticipation, the court’s executive committee approved two new emergency rules.

Rule 1.10 clarifies that jurors will be selected countywide for all trials in order to ensure that a representative cross-section of our community is able to appear. Rule 1.10a then provides for the advance, remote completion of juror questionnaires, including hardship deferral requests.”

Small claims trials and certain urgent matter hearings will be heard remotely. “Further, with the unanimous approval of its Judicial Executive Committee, the Court has adopted new emergency Local Rules 1.8b and 4.116, and has amended Local Rule 3.30 and emergency Local Rule 4.115, all effective Thursday, May 21, 2020.” The rules detail processes for appearing remotely and procedures for civil and criminal matters.

Limited public access to court buildings is being allowed for records searches. Visitors must wear face coverings. The court is providing audio access to non-confidential proceedings.

Alpine County Superior Court: As of June 22, criminal matters are no longer being held remotely, the court announced. All visitors to the courthouse grounds must wear face coverings. All civic and traffic matters will continue to be heard by telephone appearance until further notice. 

Amador County Superior Court: The court resumed all calendars, remotely where possible, on June 1. The clerk’s office will be open to accept filings from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., although social distancing in the courthouse will be enforced. Jury trials resumed in June. The court on July 1 rescinded an order temporarily halting the issuance of writs of possession in residential eviction matters. Face coverings are required in the court.

Butte County Superior Court:  Presiding Judge Clare Keithley, citing a spike in COVID-19 cases, issued an emergency order on July 21 delaying criminal jury trials set for dates set between July 22 and Aug. 3. Keithley also ordered that no inmates be transported to the courthouse through the end of July; arraignments will take place at the jail through video feeds. 

On July 31, Keithley, noting that the pandemic spike had not abated, issued another order extending emergency operations procedures from Aug. 1 “until further order of the court.”

Two other orders issued that day address telephonic appearances and delays in arraignments and dependency proceedings. The changes follow an emergency authorization, the fourth for the court, issued by the chief justice.

Keithley on July 13 issued an order barring access to the courthouse to anyone who, within the previous 14 days, has tested positive for COVID-19, has been in contact with someone who is infected or has displayed symptoms of COVID-19.

Calaveras County Superior Court:  Effective May 18, the clerk’s window is open but only to those who are wearing face coverings. To minimize the number of people in the clerk’s lobby area, people must pull a number from a kiosk and wait for their turn. Parties are encouraged to use online services. A May 21 order rescinds a previous order limiting access to the courthouse to those only those parties required to appear in court.  While in the courthouse, visitors are required to wear face coverings and practice physical distancing. 

Colusa County Superior Court: The court resumed limited operations on June 1  Those required to appear in court must wear a face covering. The court has posted adjustments to calendars and operations here

The chief justice issued a fourth emergency order for the court on July 28  allowing the court to convene sessions anywhere in the county, including jails, through Aug. 31.

Contra Costa County Superior Court: The court on July 29 adopted amended civil emergency rules laying out procedures for remote proceedings, hearings and filings.

The chief justice issued a seventh emergency order for the court on July 31, authorizing delays of some dependency proceedings where the deadline would have expired through Aug. 28.  An eighth order issued Aug. 12 extends by up to 30 days the deadline for holding a criminal trial in cases where that deadline would have otherwise expired between Aug. 12 and Sept. 10.

Courthouses reopened to the public May 26 . Visitors, who must wear face coverings, will have their temperatures checked upon entry.

Del Norte County Superior Court:  The court opened on a daily basis starting May 26 for limited operations. Proceedings will be conducted remotely whenever possible. Those entering the courthouse will be asked to physically distance and will be “strongly encouraged” to wear a face covering. The clerk’s office reopened to the public on June 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Only two people will be allowed into the lobby at any one time.

El Dorado County Superior Court: On Aug. 4 the court announced initial juror appearances (but not trials) for Department 9 will be conducted online. The court is posting all standing orders here.

 New physical distancing protocols were posted for all courthouses on June 18. The court announced on April 28 that it plans to vacate all civil trials on the 2020 calendar “because it is anticipated that there will be a large volume of criminal trials which will have statutory priority.” Motions tied to trial dates will be reset.

“The court hopes to begin hearing law and motion matters sometime in June; however, with these uncertain times, hearings will be held in a manner designed to ensure the public health and safety of our staff, the litigants, the attorneys and the public.”

Fresno County Superior Court: The chief justice issued a sixth emergency order for the court on July 16 authorizing extensions of deadlines for arraigning defendants through mid-August and holding criminal trials through mid-September.

Presiding Judge Arlan Harrell on June 16 issued a general order clarifying the May 1 emergency implementation order. Everyone entering a Fresno County courthouse must wear a face covering. The court is live streaming some proceedings.

Glenn County Superior Court: The court resumed operations on May 19 and requires the use of face coverings. Parties in civil, probate and family law cases are strongly encouraged to appear by telephone.

An Aug. 5 posting by the court provides information about operations and services at the court.

Humboldt County Superior Court:  The court announced that on May 18 it “resume[d] civil, family law, and probate calendars using remote video and phone conferencing.” Courtrooms and the clerk’s office remain closed to the public until further notice.  The court is broadcasting public hearings. The chief justice issued a third emergency order on June 19 authorizing the court to extend the time period for holding a criminal trial by up to 30 days for cases where the statutory deadlines would have expired between June 22 and Aug. 6.

Imperial County Superior Court:  Effective May 11, the court added family law matters to the criminal and misdemeanor cases, juvenile hearings, and some civil and probate matters that are being heard remotely. Brawley and Winterhaven courthouses were closed to the public. No jury trials are taking place although summonses for future proceedings are being sent. Amendments to local rules are being posted here.

Inyo County Superior Court:  Presiding Judge Brian Lamb issued a nine-page order on March 20 detailing new operations procedures, including limited access to courthouses. Lamb also signed an emergency bail schedule order on April 10. The chief justice issued a second emergency order for the court on April 14.

Kern County Superior Court: The court on July 9 delayed for 90 days all civil trials expected to take longer than two days. The order affects cases set for trial in the metropolitan division between July 8 and Oct. 8. 

A July 8 order by the chief justice auuthorizes the court to extend the deadline for holding a criminal trial by up to 30 days in cases where the deadline would otherwise have expired between july 8 and Sept. 8.

The court on May 11 posted an emergency local rule regarding complaince with the Speedy Trial Act.  Court leaders on April 28 announced an expansion of services through the use of video conferences and telephone appearances.  ”Some Civil cases may be eligible to conduct video settlements on a ‘per request’ basis.”

Kings County Superior Court: The chief justice issued a fourth emergency order for the court on July 14, authorizing the court to delay holding a criminal trial by up to 30 days in cases where the deadline would have otherwise expired between July 16 and Aug. 18. 

On June 16, Presiding Judge Robert Shane Burns issued a general order extending certain time periods and requiring the use of technology, when possible, to conduct hearings. The court on April 1 issued a general order putting into force the trial delays and deadline extensions found in the chief justice’s March 30 statewide order. 

Lake County Superior Court:  The court on July 31 updated its operations status, noting that many hearings are taking place remotely.

The court announced expanding services starting June 1, with many proceedings taking place by phone or video. A June 4 order mandates the use of face covering, with exceptions. The court began holding jury trials after June 22. The Clearlake branch began holding calendars again June 22.  Anyone entering a court buliding must wear a face covering.

Lassen County Superior Court: The court on May 21 posted a new operations plan that took effect on May 26. A June 17 order explains procedures for online proceedings. The courthouse is open daily with physical distancing requirements and temperature screenings at the doors. Some proceedings are taking place remotely. Calendars are limited.

LA superior court Los Angeles Superior Court

Los Angeles County Superior Court:  The chief justice issued a seventh emergency order for the court on Aug. 10 authorizing delays in a host of proceedings where procedural deadlines would have otherwise expired between Aug. 10 and Sept. 8. Presiding Judge Kevin Brazile also announced 

Presiding Judge Kevin Brazile announced that civil jury trials will be delayed until January and that civil non-jury trials will not start before Nov. 16.

“The Los Angles County Department of Public Health has expressed concerns to the Court about commencing jury trials and bringing jurors into County courthouses given the current COVID-19 numbers and trends,” Brazile said.

Effective Aug. 10 the court extended remote appearance technology to all 250 criminal courtrooms.

 

Madera County Superior Court: The court closed the self-help program to walk-in assistance on July 1 due to concerns about the novel coronavirus. The court issued a reintroduction-of-services plan on May 27.

The court has authorized and is encouraging remote appearances.

Marin County Superior Court:  The chief justice on July 20 issued a seventh emergency order for the court authorizing the extension of deadlines for numerous classes of proceedings.

On June 16, the court adopted a local emergency rule on prospective jurors’ request for hardship excuses. The court resumed many operations on June 1, with many proceedings taking place in virtual courtrooms. Clerk’s offices opened on June 1. Jury service returned on June 18; no more than 20 jurors will be in the assembly room at any one time. Visitors to the courthouse must wear a face covering.

Mariposa County Superior Court: The chief justice issued an emergency order for the court on March 23 allowing the court to hold proceedings anywhere in the county, including jail. A June 22 court order mandates the use of face coverings and the practice of physical distancing inside the courthouse. The court is livestreaming proceedings.

Mendocino County Superior Court: A May 4 implementation order says access to the Ukiah and Fort Bragg courthouses remains limited. Clerks’ offices are open but filers are asked to use drop boxes or online services. Visitors entering the courthouses must wear face coverings. 

Merced County Superior Court: On Aug. 3 the court announced modified operations. “Jury service” will continue. The court resumed imposing civil assessments on traffic infractions on Aug. 10.

Starting June 1, the court began some in-person proceedings. Parties entering the courthouse will have their temperatures checked at the door and will be required to wear face coverings. “All civil jury trials currently set between Tuesday, March 17, and Monday August 31, 2020 will be continued on a rolling basis for 8 weeks from the currently scheduled trial date. “

The chief justice issued a sixth emergency order on July 29 authorizing the court to hold proceedings anywhere in the county, including jails, for the rest of the year and to delay for up to 30 days the start of criminal trials where the statutory deadline would otherwise expire between Aug. 1 and Sept. 15.

Modoc County Superior Court: The court resumed regular court operations on June 1.

Mono County Superior Court: The Mammoth Lakes and Bridgeport courthouses are handling only “time-sensitive and essential” functions, according to a posting by the court. An emergency order issued by the chief justice on Aug. 10 authorizes the court to delay the start of criminal trials by up to 30 days in cases where the deadline would have otherwise expired between Aug. 24 and Sept. 14.

Monterey County Superior Court:  Clerk’s offices have reopened. The court detailed new court operations plans on May 26. Jury trials in criminal cases resumed on June 1. Jury trials in civil matters resumed on June 15. The court is encouraging the use of telephonic and remote appearances.

“Many fewer jurors will be summoned to the court” and face coverings will be required. A limited number of civil matters are being heard. Preference is given to matters that can be heard remotely.

Napa County Superior Court: The court resumed all court operations on June 1. Proceedings are taking place remotely where possible. Jury service was expected to resume June 15. Visitors must wear face coverings. The court announced expanded use of remote appearance technology on July 24.

Nevada County Superior Court: A July 20 order by the court mandates the wearing of face coverings in courthouses. 

The chief justice issued a seventh emergency order for the court on July 8 extending filing deadlines and criminal-trial start-dates in some cases. The order also allows the court to hold sessions anywhere in the county, including jails and juvenilel detention facilities.

Jury trials were scheduled to resume in late June. “The court has expanded the scope of its operations county wide to include family law and civil matters as well as traffic matters at the Truckee courthouse.” A May 28 executive order details expanded operations for the court.

Orange County Superior Court: The chief justice on July 16 issued a seventh emergency order for the court authorizing delays in certain dependency hearings.

The court enacted temporary procedures on June 17 for establishing “good cause” to conduct civil and probate jury trials. A separate order issued July 7 bars anyone from engaging in “workouts, sports and physical activities” on courthouse property.

Jury trials have restarted after a soft reopening began on May 26. Preliminary hearings in felony matters began that day as did four criminal jury trials that were suspended during the pandemic closures.

According to a notice posted May 1, civil “trial dates for all trials scheduled to begin as of March 17, 2020 forward will be rescheduled approximately 25 weeks from the currently scheduled trial date, with notice to all parties.” Civil trials in progress as of March 17 will be vacated.

Placer County Superior Court: Citing rising numbers of COVID-19 cases locally, the court announced on July 28 that no jury trials will be held between Aug. 3 and Aug. 28. 

“With the exception of arraignments and trial assignment hearings, the court will postpone all hearings in misdemeanor cases, excluding driving under the influence, domestic violence and traffic cases, set between August 3, 2020, and August 28, 2020, in which the defendant is not in custody. Cases will be reset to an available date at least eight weeks from the currently scheduled court date.”

The court on July 9 postponed infraction matters on calendar between July 13 and Aug. 28 for 16 weeks. Other traffic-related matters will be delayed, too. Additionally, all small claims matters will be heard remotely starting July 20.

The court launched new service plans for civil and criminal cases on July 9.

The court started to increase operations on May 11 with a focus on felony matters, misdemeanor arraignments and juvenile justice and dependency matters.  “Civil law and motion, case management conferences, ex parte hearings, probate hearings, guardianships and conservatorship hearings, and similar matters will be heard. Telephone appearances are mandatory.”

Plumas County Superior Court: A second order issued by the chief justice on April 22 extended deadlines for certain matters scheduled through May 18.  The court announced on March 21 that it is only handling pressing matters, according to a notice posted by court officials. That notice has not been updated on the court’s website.

Riverside County Superior Court: The court announced “the Corona Court, the Moreno Valley Court, the Temecula Court, the Hemet Court, the Riverside Self-Help Center, and the Riverside Records Center will be temporarily closed from August 10, 2020 until further notice.”

The chief justice issued a tenth emergency order for the court on July 29 authorizing a 30-day delay in criminal trials for cases that would have been required to start between Aug. 3 and Sept. 30.

A previous order for the court on July 21 authorized temporary delays in felony arraignments and extending certain document-filing deadlines.

On June 1, the court rescinded the court holiday governing all non-emergency general civil and lmited civil filings. Non-emergency civil documents can be filed online, via mail or in a courthouse dropbox. The court began summoning jurors for trials set to resume in mid-June.

Everyone entering the courthouse must wear a face covering, and jury assembly rooms are being reconfigured to promote physical distancing.

Sacramento County Superior Court:  The court posted an update on its operations on Aug. 3. A related notice outlines phased and limited resetting of trial and mandatory settlement conference dates.

On July 15 the chief justice issued a seventh emergency order for the court authorizing temporary delays in proceedings, including starts of criminal trials, and filing deadlines. The court’s ensuing order is here.

“Effective June 4, all Ex Parte Applications for the Civil Law and Motion Departments shall be reserved by appointment only. All ex parte hearings will be conducted remotely via telephone.”

The court expected to resume holding criminal jury trials on June 15. Spectator seating for criminal jury trials and some sentencing hearings will be made available by lottery.

Court visitors and employees will have their temperatures taken at court entrances. Anyone who comes into court through a screening station must wear a face covering. The court is posting updates for various court operations here.  Some hearings are being live streamed.

San Benito County Superior Court: Access to the courthouse remains limited, and visitors, who must wear face coverings, can expect to have their tempearture checked. A new court calendar system goes into effect July 6 

San Bernardino County Superior Court:  The chief justice issued a fifth emergency order for the court on July 16 authorizing delays in numerous classes of proceedings. The court began ramping up services on May 29. All courthouses, with the exception of those in Big Bear and Needles, are open for limited hours and modified services.  Visitors are required to wear face masks and maintain physicial distance from other people. Live audio streaming of certain proceedings is available.

San Diego County Superior Court:  The chief justice issued a 13th emergency order for the court on Aug. 11 extending the time to arraign a felony suspect from 48 hours to no more than seven days in cases where the deadline would otherwise have expired between Aug. 13 and Sept. 9

A previous, 12th emergency order for the court on Aug. 7 authorized a delay of up to 30 days to start criminal trials that would have otherwise been required to start between Aug. 13 and Sept. 17.

The court on July 8 announced that jury trials are suspended through Aug. 17. The court resumed most other operations on May 26 

Presiding Judge Lorna Alksne on May 13 signed a general order outlining new procedures for civil cases.  The court is rescheduling 87,000 hearings postoponed due to the pandemic-related closures.

The court is livestreaming certain proceedings  Courthouse visitors and employees are required to wear masks. Anyone entering a courthouse will have their temperature checked.

San Francisco Superior Court: The court restored “a number of services” on June 1. The court issued nine pages of procedural guidance for the partial reopening here. Many proceedings will take place by telephone or video conferencing.

Courthouse visitors will be required to bring and wear face coverings. “Please expect longer lines and wait times. The court will follow social distancing requirements inside and outside our facilities and some building access will be limited.”

The chief justice issued a fourth emergency order for the court on May 27.

San Joaquin County Superior Court:  The court updated its operations situation on Aug. 7. The Lodi branch will remain closed while one department in the Manteca courthouse will be open. Jurors are being summoned. Some hearings are taking place telephonically.

San Luis Obispo County Superior Court:  A May 8 memo says “regular civil law and motions hearings, case management conferences, name changes and trial setting conferences are scheduled to resume on June 1, 2020, via remote technology only.” Courts in San Luis Obispo, Paso Robles and Grover Beach are open only to visitors who have business before the court that day. Criminal jury trials resumed on June 15. The court has posted an operations FAQ page here.

The chief justice issued a sixth emergency order on July 31 authorizing the court to extend certain deadlines through Aug. 29.

San Mateo County Superior Court:  Acting Presiding Judge Leland Davis issued two orders on Aug. 5  One requires the use of face coverings and sets procedures for limiting the spread of COVID-19 in courthouses. The second lifts the temporary jury trial suspension effective Aug. 10.

Presiding Judge Jonathan Karesh had previously signed an order on July 20 suspending all jury trials until Aug. 17. Karesh cited “the significant increase in the number of COVID-19 cases in San Mateo County during the last two weeks, as well as the courtroom exposure of a jury to a person who had tested positive for COVID-19.”

Karesh signed an order on July 13 allowing the court to hold proceedings anywhere in the county, including jails and juvenile detention facilities. The order also extended timelines in certain cases through mid- and late- August. On the same day, Karesh issued a calendar memo curtailing certain calendars given the rise in positive tests.

Santa Barbara County Superior Court:  The court expanded the range of proceedings it’s handling on May 21. 

“The Court now cautiously resumes civil, family law, and probate matters by expanding the use of conference calling and video conferencing technology. Matters scheduled, but postponed during the court closure are now being rescheduled, and self-represented parties and attorneys will begin receiving notification of a new hearing date.”

The chief justice issued a sixth emergency order for the court on July 7 authorizing the deadlne for starting a felony criminal trial by up to 30 days for cases where the deadline would have otherwise expired through Aug. 17.

Santa Clara County Superior Court:  Citing the pandemic and budget cuts, the court on Aug. 7 announced reduced office and telephone hours. Business matters usually handled at the Palo Alto and Morgan Hill offices will now be handled in San jose at the Hall of Justice.

The chief justice issued a 12th emergency order on Aug. 12 authorizing the court to delay by up to 30 days criminal trials in cases where the statutory deadline would have otherwise expired between Aug. 14 and Sept. 14.

An 11th emergency order on July 31 authorized the court to declare a holiday between Aug. 1 and Aug. 31 for the purpose of calculating certain deadlines

On July 15, Presiding Judge Deborah Ryan signed a general order delaying the start of criminal trials through mid-August. On June 15, the clerk’s offices at the Hall of Justice Criminal Courthouse and the Family Justice Center Courthouse reopened.  The civil and traffic court clerk’s offices reopened for in-person services on June 29.

Face coverings are required in public areas and shared work spaces. access to courthouses is restrictedThe court on April 27 announced the use of listen-only telephone lines to allow remote access to hearings. The court is posting general orders tied to emergency operations on its website.

Santa Cruz County Superior Court: On July 27, the chief justice issued a fourth emergency order for the court authorizing leaders to delay by up to 30 days criminal trials that would have had to start between Aug. 1 and Sept. 8.

The court announced that it is transition to Zoom for remote appearances.

The court began phase one of a multi-phase reopening plan on June 1. Most court staff have returned to work and limited operations will continue. No dates have been set yet to resume jury trials or small claims trials. Everyone entering the courhouses are required to wear face coverings and to practice physical distancing.  Employees are undergoing daily health screenings.

The court on April 20 posted 18 pages of emergency rules related to COVID-19. 

Shasta County Superior Court:  The court resumed limited operations on May 5 in what the court executive officer described as a “soft courthouse reopening.” Most proceedings are being held by telephone, although some in-person appearances are happening. Everyone entering the court is encouraged to wear a mask. The court posted a jury trial assignment policy on June 3.

Sierra County Superior Court: The court’s website says that the court is handling all matters remotely until further notice. The chief justice on July 29 issued a sixth emergency order authorizing the court to hold proceedings anywhere in the county, including the jail, through Aug. 27.

Siskiyou County Superior Court: The chief justice on July 31 issued a fourth emergency order authorizing the court to delay the start of criminal trials for up to 30 days in cases where the deadline would otherwise expire between Aug. 3 and Sept. 21. 

Solano County Superior Court: The court reinstated limited proceedings, both by remote appearances and in-person physical distancing, on May 18. “With the exception of jury trials scheduled between May 18 and July 1, 2020, civil cases will remain as currently calendared. To promote social distancing, attorneys, parties and interested persons are strongly encouraged to appear remotely via Zoom, telephone conference call or CourtCall for all hearings with the exception of court trials, unless otherwise ordered by the department.”

The court is posting notices of continued hearings on its website.

Sonoma County Superior Court: Presiding Judge Bradford DeMeo issued a general order on July 29 ordering 30-day delays in criminal trials in which the original or statutory deadline would have expired between Aug. 1 and Aug. 31.

Starting July 13, criminal matters moved from the Empire Annex Courthouse to their traditional home in the Hall of Justice. 

The court expanded operations and opened an additional nine courtrooms on June 1. Generally, only people with court hearings in criminal actions, witnesses and jurors on duty that day will be allowed into the courthouse. Remote attendance is encouraged. Visitors must participate in a “health screening protocol” before entering the courthouse. 

Stanislaus County Superior Court: The chief justice issued an eigth emergency order for the court on Aug. 11 authorizing the court to extend statutory time periods in numerous classes of cases. 

Most civil and probate cases resumed May 18, although remote appearances will be required in certain matters. “Court trials and related settlement conferences will resume in person unless all parties agree to conduct them remotely.”

Civil jury trials and mandatory settlement conferences associatated wtih those trials scheduled through August 18, 2020, will be vacated and set for a case management conference. “The Court continues to work on a plan for conducting jury trials “

Sutter County Superior Court: Court executive officer Stephanie Hansel said on May 19 that the court  ”has resumed courtroom calendars and [we] continue to limit lobby traffic with a drop box and triage phone line. We are, to the extent feasible, maintaining social distancing in the courtrooms and public areas. Self-help and mediation services are only available by appointment and electronic communication. We have not yet resumed jury trials.”

Tehama County Superior Court: The chief justice issued a third emergency order for the court on May 1. Presiding Judge Matthew McGlynn signed a general order for court operations on April 3.

Trinity County Superior Court: The court reopened on April 20. A public notice says the court was preparing to resume jury trials in August. The notice discusses measures the court is taking to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission by those who are visiting the courthouse. 

Tulare County Superior Court: A sixth emergency order by the chief justice authorizes the court to hold sessions anywhere in the county, including jails, between Aug. 11 and Sept. 18. The order also allows the court to delay by up to 30 days the start of criminal trials where the statutory requirement to do so would have otherwise expired between Aug. 11 and Sept. 18.

A July 8 order by the court restricts general access to the courthouse and allows any judge to extend the deadline for starting certain criminal trials by up to 30 days through mid-August. The South County Justice Center in Porterville reopened on June 30 after an employee previously tested positive for COVID-19. The court began conducting hearings again in most case types on June 4.

Tuolumne County Superior Court: Jury trials resumed on June 17. The court announced that it began increasing services and operations on May 18. “In the first phase, cases currently on a court calendar will be heard on the date the cases were scheduled to be heard, and will not be continued unless for good cause. “

Courthouse visitors must wear face coverings. In-person hearings are being scheduled in a way to reduce the number of people in the courthouse. “The court counter located at 60 N. Washington St., Sonora, will also return to normal hours of service from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.”

Ventura County Superior Court: The court in late July posted the steps it is taking to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission. A June 9 order signed by Presiding Judge Kent Kellegrew outlined court operations, which generally resumed on June 15. Physical access to the court is limited. Some proceedings are being ivestreamed subject to the discretion of individual judges. The court has posted a civil reopening plan here.

Yolo County Superior Court: The court is open with reduced calendars for essential functions. Almost all appearances are being handled presumptively by video. Criminal jury trials are expected to resume in July. Some jurors are being asked to report by Zoom. Visitors are required to wear face coverings.

Yuba County Superior Court: The court reopened May 1 “with strict social distancing” requirements in place. Visitors receive health screenings at the door and must wear face coverings. 

The California Supreme Court: 

The court on March 16 suspended in-person oral arguments until ”deemed prudent to resume normal measures.” Counsel are appearing by video or telephone. All oral argument sessions will be held in San Francisco.

The court also extended mandatory filings of all documents, including briefs. and extended proceedings with deadlines through April 20 an additional 30 days.

California Courts of Appeal:

The chief justice on April 15 issued a second order for the appellate courts extending time periods in the Rules of Court by no more than 30 days.

The First District court in San Francisco has cancelled all in-person oral arguments until further notice. Attorneys who choose to present oral arguments must do so by video after June 17. The chief justice issued an emergency order for the court on March 18. The court issued a second implementation order on April 15.

The Second District court will be holding video or telephonic oral arguments for the duration of the COVID-19 emergency. The courtroom will be closed to the public, although proceedings can be watched online. The chief justice issued an order giving the court up to 30 extra days to  “do any act required or permitted under the California Rules of Court. ” The court’s April 15 implementation order is here.

The Third District court in Sacramento will hold all oral arguments, starting with its July calendar, by videoconference. The public can watch the proceedings online.

The Fourth District courts received an emergency order from the chief justice extending by up to 30 days “any act required or permitted under the California Rules of Court. ” In-court oral arguments have been suspended. Counsel who choose to present oral arguments must do so by telephone. The court issued an April 15 implementation order.

The Fifth District court in Fresno has suspended all in-person oral arguments. Telephone and video appearances can be arranged. The chief justice issued an executive order for the court on March 23. The court’s April 15 implementation order is here.

The Sixth District court in San Jose has temporarily closed its clerk’s office window. Oral arguments are being conducted telephonically. Court users who cannot file their papers electronically are asked to use the dropbox on the 10th floor of 333 W. Santa Clara St. in San Jose. The chief justice issued an emergency order on March 18 authorizing the court to extend by 30 days the deadline for any act required or permitted under California Rules of Court.

Commission on Judicial Performance: The commission’s offices are temporarily closed to the public. The agency is continuing to accept complaints submitted by mail.

Gov. Gavin Newsom on April 6 appointed Fresno sole practitioner Victor Salazar to the commission.

State Bar of California: The bar resumed full operations at its San Francisco and Los Angeles offices on June 15. Visitors must wear face coverings, and they will have their temperatures checked at the door. Appointments are required for meetings with staff.

The board of trustees adopted emergency rule changes that will waive late payment penalties for attorneys affected by COVID-19; extend the penalty deadline for law corporation renewal to June 30; and extend some compliance deadlines to Sept. 30.