Like other appointees, lawyers tapped to serve in the administration in Washington are required to file papers revealing how much they’re worth and the sources of those funds. These government ethics disclosures, collected since January, show down to the dollar how much a law firm partner earned from a firm. Below and in the slideshow above are some of the top billers who’ve joined since President Donald Trump took office in January.

Jay Clayton – $7,623,900 total Nobody expected Sullivan & Cromwell to pay poorly. Indeed, the SEC chairman earned $7.6 million over 13 months as a partner at Sullivan & Cromwell. Read more.

David Friedman – $2,705,692 total The U.S. ambassador to Israel used to be the fourth name partner at then-Kasowitz, Benson, Torres & Friedman. For that, he earned $2.7 million from his partnership share in 2016. Friedman was a partner or managing member of several other companies, including a winery. Read more.

Chris Wray – $9,241,463 total Now this is a big Big Law paycheck. Christopher Wray earned $9.2 million over 18 months from King & Spalding’s partnership. He anticipated another $1 million to $5 million payout from the partnership share after June. Wray became FBI Director on Aug. 1. Read more.

Donald McGahn Jr. and Gregory Katsas – $6,267,440 total The White House counsel and deputy both left Jones Day for jobs advising the president. While McGahn is higher-ranked at the White House, he earned $2.4 million at the firm, compared to Katsas’ $3.9 million from the partnership in 2016. Patton Boggs, which McGahn left before its 2014 merger with Squire Sanders, still owes him between $100,000 and $250,000 in compensation and capital payments. Read more.

Jessie Liu – $1,091,999 total Before Jessie Liu was nominated to be the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, she was a partner at Jenner & Block then moved to Morrison & Foerster in April. In early 2016, she made $196,000 from her partnership share at Jenner, then pulled in $896,000 at MoFo until this May.

Robert Lighthizer – $1,838,400+ Robert Lighthizer, the U.S. Trade Representative, said he no longer billed clients for work in recent years at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. Still, he pulled in $1.8 million as a partner last year, and anticipated another $1 million to $5 million from his share as of January. Read more.

Curtis Mahoney – $833,238+ Williams & Connolly’s partnership will say goodbye to C.J. Mahoney so he can become deputy U.S. Trade Representative. He made $833,238 from his partnership share at the firm from January 2016 until May this year. Mahoney anticipated money from his share worth another half million to $1 million within two months of leaving the firm. Read more.

Brent McIntosh – $2,885,127 The general counsel at the Treasury Department made $2.9 million from Sullivan & Cromwell during 2016 and through January. Read more.

Peter Davidson – $3,364,634 The general counsel at the Commerce Department made $3.4 million in salary, cash payments, severance and unused vacation time as a lobbyist for Verizon Communications from January 2016 through May this year. Read more.

Noel Francisco – $4,584,545 The lawyer nominated to be U.S. Solicitor General earned $4.6 million from his partnership share over 15 months while at Jones Day. About a half-million dollars of that income he may not see until the year 2024, because the firm holds on to it to pay taxes. Until his nomination in March, Francisco served as the principal deputy solicitor general and as acting solicitor general. Read more.

Makan Delrahim – $1,094,268 Before he was nominated as head of the antitrust division at the Department of Justice, Makan Delrahim made $1.1 million from Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck in his salary, bonus, the firm’s buy-back of his equity shares and a distribution between January 2016 and this February. Read more.

Steven Engel – $1,835,415+ Steven Engel is a partner at Dechert and earned the nomination to lead the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel. He made $1.8 million in 2016 and January this year, plus a $75,000 bonus for his work in 2015. Read more.

Eric Dreiband – $2,206,078 Eric Dreiband will leave Jones Day’s partnership to lead the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division once confirmed. He made $2.2 million from his partnership share and bonus while at the firm in 2016 until this May. He’s also still entitled to an Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld partners’ retirement plan, though he left that firm in 2008. Read more.

Robert Mueller III, James Quarles III, Jeannie Rhee and Aaron Zebley – $12,845,093 total They’re not working for Trump per se, but these four Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr partners revealed their worth in joining the Justice Department’s special counsel probe. Quarles was Wilmer’s top earner of the four, at $5.9 million. Mueller made $3.5 million. Rhee made $2.1 million. And Zebley made $1.4 million. All amounts spanned from January 2016 through this July, because of federal disclosure guidelines. Their compensation together likely represents almost 2 percent of the firm’s yearly total profits.