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Retired federal judge Andrew Peck has seen technology make its way into the courts, in part due to his own rulings promoting technology-assisted review (TAR) in e-discovery in 2012’s Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe and 2015’s Rio Tinto v. Valle. However, he says there is still work to be done to integrate technology into the law,  not only in the discovery process, but in archiving and information governance, privacy concerns around new data sources like biometrics, and more.

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