Electronic discovery, even more so than traditional paper discovery, offers the opportunity to burden unduly an opposing party with overbroad discovery requests, and three recent New York State court decisions have addressed over-reaching document requests seeking electronically stored information (ESI).

Responding to far-reaching requests for the production of e-mails and metadata, as well as electronic information contained on, among other things, hard drives, computer servers, backup tapes, voice mail and personal digital assistants (PDAs) can be very burdensome and extremely costly to the producing party.

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