A Pennsylvania Superior Court decision issued late last week has shed light on a legal loophole that appears to let off the hook those who view child pornography on their computers but don’t save those images on their hard drives.

Ruling on an issue of first impression, the three-judge panel in Commonwealth v. Diodoro concluded that merely looking at child pornography on the Internet — without intentionally saving or downloading any images viewed — does not amount to “knowing possession” of child porn as proscribed in Pennsylvania’s Crimes and Offenses Code.

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