The last few weeks have witnessed further evolution of the world of user-upload sites. MySpace.com and YouTube.com were once youthful rebels; their founders were young, their audience was predominantly under 30. These sites allowed youngsters to post their own video material. This, in turn, enraged copyright holders, because some of the postings used (and sometimes were in entirety) copyrighted material, taken without permission.

Doug Morris, CEO of Universal, was quoted by The Associated Press in September as saying: “We believe these new businesses are copyright infringers and owe us tens of millions of dollars.”

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