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In this month’s After Hours: A new book collects the work of Marilyn Church, who has been on hand to capture the trials and profiles of some of America’s most notorious killers. Can something as intangible and elusive as meditation really work for those whose professional life centers on rules? Plus the latest book, restaurant, music and wine reviews…
• Camera Eye For more than three decades, Marilyn Church has been on hand to capture the trials and profiles of some of America’s most notorious killers. Recently, some of her best work was collected in The Art of Justice: An Eyewitness View of Thirty Infamous Trials. by Douglas McCollam
• Look Inward, Attorney Can something as intangible and elusive as meditation really work for those whose professional life centers on rules? Is the idea of a meditating lawyer a contradiction in terms? Be still, skeptics. A fair number of lawyers and others connected to the D.C. legal world embrace meditation. by James H. Johnston
• A Symphony Without Notes The second weekend in June brings a rare confluence of thrills for fans of Gustav Mahler (right): The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will play his massive “Resurrection” Symphony, while the National Symphony Orchestra will present his “Symphony of a Thousand,” whose popular title just barely overstates the forces needed to perform the piece. by Peter Gutmann
• Italian Traditions Updated at Spezie Some of the best restaurants in town are right under your nose — the ones you pass by every day on the way to the office but for some reason never check out. Spezie (right), a superior and steady Italian restaurant, falls in that category for some. by Tony Mauro • Dear Taste Buds Our Cork Reporter feels the need to write a letter of apology to his taste buds… by Phillip Dub�
• A Peek Into the Marble Palace In the legal profession, perhaps no figure is as intriguing as the Supreme Court law clerk. A review of the new Courtiers of the Marble Palace: The Rise and Influence of the Supreme Court Law Clerk by Todd Peppers. by Rodger Citron
• More Than Mickey Mouse Sorcerers’ Apprentices: 100 Years of Law Clerks at the United States Supreme Court, by political science professors Artemus Ward and David L. Weiden, suggests that modern Supreme Court clerks play an ominous — rather than humorous — role in the work of the Court. by Stephen R. McAllister

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