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Click here for the full text of this decision FACTS:Anna Haslam Fuller was the middle car in a three-car chain-reaction car accident. Fuller was insured by State Farm insurance, as was the driver of the back car, Andrea Snodgrass. Both women submitted claims to State Farm. Based on its investigation into the physical evidence, a State Farm adjuster concluded that Fuller was at fault and authorized the repair of Snodgrass’ vehicle without charging her a deductible. State Farm paid Fuller’s property damage except for a $500 deductible. The claims adjuster did not, however, note his liability determination in the claim file. Fuller sued State Farm, alleging that, when State Farm adjusted claims where both parties were insured by State Farm, it routinely required the insureds to incur a deductible for denying both insureds’ claims for liability and requiring them to have their vehicles repaired under the collision coverage of their policies. Fuller’s suit was in the form of a class action. She sought to represent the class in two ways: 1. each individual who has been involved in an auto accident involving another State Farm insured in which no or each insured was determined to be at fault, each and/or either State Farm insured was required to make a claim on their own policy and thus incur a deductible within two years prior to the filing of this suit; and 2. each individual who has been involved in an auto accident involving another State Farm insured in which no or each insured was determined to be at fault each and/or either State Farm insured was required to make a claim on their own policy and thus incur a deductible within four years prior to the filing of this suit. The trial court granted State Farm’s motion to strike Fuller’s class allegations, because it determined that Fuller was not representative of the class she purported to represent. Fuller appeals. HOLDING:Affirmed. In order to qualify as a class representative under the criteria she set down, Fuller must show either that both she and Snodgrass were determined by State Farm to be at fault, or that both she and Snodgrass were determined to be not at fault. Only Fuller was found to be at fault, the court finds, and there is nothing to indicate that State Farm manipulated its liability findings to prevent Fuller from qualifying as a class representative. OPINION:Anne Gardner, J.; Cayce, C.J., Holman and Gardner, JJ.

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