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http://nycourts.law.com/CourtDocumentViewer.asp?view=Document&docID=47173 Judge McMahon PETITIONER FILED a petition for a writ of habeas corpus challenging his conviction in the City Court of Middletown for criminal contempt. Petitioner claimed the trial court failed to inform him of his constitutional rights in a proper manner before he agreed to plead guilty to criminal contempt, and that, as a result, “he had not entered into the plea voluntarily, knowingly and intelligently.” The court denied the petition, noting petitioner was not specifically advised about his right not to testify against himself, his right to confront his accuser, his right to a unanimous verdict, or his right to have counsel represent him at all stages of the proceedings. The court determined, however, that the Supreme Court has never specifically imposed that requirement on state tribunals. The court added that the City Court judge was acting in full conformity with People v. Harris, which has governed the conduct of plea allocutions in the state courts for 20 years.

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