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Executive Vice President/Chief Legal Officer of VNU, Inc. General Counsel, The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation As deputy GC of Paramount Communications Inc. in the mid-1990s, he essentially ran its legal department during a savage battle for the company’s controlbetween Viacom Inc. and QVCNetwork, Inc. Viacom won. In 1996, as GC at Dun & Bradstreet, he guided the business’s split into three parts. Doppelt says he still finds it interesting that VNU reconnected two of the companies-ACNielsen and Nielsen Media-he previously watched Dun & Bradstreet split up. Ellen Oran Kaden, 51 Senior Vice President, Law & Government Affairs, Campbell Soup Company Executive Vice President, Secretary, & General Counsel, CBS Inc. She became a reluctant newsmaker for her reportedly prominent role in CBS’s controversial decision-later reversed-to kill a 60 Minutes interview with a tobacco industry whistleblower. Critics said Kaden tried to quash the broadcast to avoid a tobacco company lawsuit and keep on track Westinghouse’s impending acquisition of CBS-in which she had a tiny stake. Kaden recently called that charge preposterous. She was a tenure-track professor at Columbia Law School in the late 1970s with only two other female colleagues: Vivian Berger and Ruth Bader-Ginsburg. Shelley Lanza, 46 Executive Vice President, General Counsel, Starbucks Coffee Company until May 2002. Starbucks says she is now a consultant for them. General Counsel, Starbucks Coffee Company She handled a tall order-real estate acquisitions, joint venture deals, and intellectual property issues-with aplomb. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported in April that she resigned because her responsibilities had been diminished. Lanza declined to comment. She worked in accounting for the Ford Motor Company and General Motors Corporation before law school. She was the first in-house lawyer at Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. Raymond Ocampo, 49 Now retired, he sits on several boards, including the CIA’s venture capital arm, In-Q-Tel. General Counsel, Oracle Corporation He was one of the software and multimedia industry’s longest serving in-house lawyers; his team probably negotiated more licenses than any other software company, said Oracle CFO Jeffrey Henley. Ocampo is director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, making him afrequent legal affairs panelist and author of treatises on the Internet and cyberlaw. A marathon competitor, he convinced his native Philippines to let him become its one-man luge team at the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics. Douglas Steenland, 51 President, Northwest Airlines Corporation; named to the NWA board 16 days after Sept. 11, 2001. General Counsel, Northwest Airlines In 1992 and 1993, Steenland helped the carrier avoid bankruptcy: He secured labor concessions, pushed lenders and suppliers toward a restructuring, and brokered a deal between shareholder factions. As NWA president, he’s faced labor issues, big security costs, and declining passenger numbers. He successfully contested mergers between United Air Lines, Inc., and US Airways, Inc.; and British Airways Plc and American Airlines, Inc. The Los Angeles Times, in July, 2002, reported that he is a candidate for CEO of United but said he might stay at NWA because of his short tenure as NWA’s president. A spokesman for Steenland denied that the executive is going anywhere. Zo� Baird, 50 President, Markle Foundation; serves on the boards of The Chubb Corporation,The Brookings Institution, and Save the Children General Counsel, Aetna Life & Casualty Company (now Aetna Inc.) Scandal (Nannygate) jettisoned her 1993 attorney general nomination. But she played a key role in Aetna’s $4 billion sale of its property/casualty business to Travelers Group Inc. Baird managed Aetna’s 120 lawyers, as Aetna’s first female VP and GC, until her 1999 move to Markle, which focuses on how technology can address public needs. Due to early deadlines, Doonesbury published several comic strips depicting Baird as attorney general. Earl Doppelt, 49 Executive Vice President/Chief Legal Officer of VNU, Inc. General Counsel, The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation As deputy GC of Paramount Communications Inc. in the mid-1990s, he essentially ran its legal department during a savage battle for the company’s controlbetween Viacom Inc. and QVCNetwork, Inc. Viacom won. In 1996, as GC at Dun & Bradstreet, he guided the business’s split into three parts. Doppelt says he still finds it interesting that VNU reconnected two of the companies-ACNielsen and Nielsen Media-he previously watched Dun & Bradstreet split up. Ellen Oran Kaden, 51 Senior Vice President, Law & Government Affairs, Campbell Soup Company Executive Vice President, Secretary, & General Counsel, CBS Inc. She became a reluctant newsmaker for her reportedly prominent role in CBS’s controversial decision-later reversed-to kill a 60 Minutes interview with a tobacco industry whistleblower. Critics said Kaden tried to quash the broadcast to avoid a tobacco company lawsuit and keep on track Westinghouse’s impending acquisition of CBS-in which she had a tiny stake. Kaden recently called that charge “preposterous.” She was a tenure-track professor at Columbia Law School in the late 1970s with only two other female colleagues: Vivian Berger and Ruth Bader-Ginsburg. Shelley Lanza, 46 Executive Vice President, General Counsel, Starbucks Coffee Company until May 2002. Starbucks says she is now a consultant for them. General Counsel, Starbucks Coffee Company She handled a tall order-real estate acquisitions, joint venture deals, and intellectual property issues-with aplomb. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported in April that she resigned because her responsibilities had been diminished. Lanza declined to comment. She worked in accounting for the Ford Motor Company and General Motors Corporation before law school. She was the first in-house lawyer at Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. Raymond Ocampo, 49 Now retired, he sits on several boards, including the CIA’s venture capital arm, In-Q-Tel. General Counsel, Oracle Corporation He was one of the software and multimedia industry’s longest serving in-house lawyers; his team “probably negotiated more licenses than any other software company,” said Oracle CFO Jeffrey Henley. Ocampo is director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, making him afrequent legal affairs panelist and author of treatises on the Internet and cyberlaw. A marathon competitor, he convinced his native Philippines to let him become its one-man luge team at the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics. Douglas Steenland, 51 President, Northwest Airlines Corporation; named to the NWA board 16 days after Sept. 11, 2001. General Counsel, Northwest Airlines In 1992 and 1993, Steenland helped the carrier avoid bankruptcy: He secured labor concessions, pushed lenders and suppliers toward a restructuring, and brokered a deal between shareholder factions. As NWA president, he’s faced labor issues, big security costs, and declining passenger numbers. He successfully contested mergers between United Air Lines, Inc., and US Airways, Inc.; and British Airways Plc and American Airlines, Inc. The Los Angeles Times, in July, 2002, reported that he is a candidate for CEO of United but said he might stay at NWA because of his short tenure as NWA’s president. A spokesman for Steenland denied that the executive is going anywhere. Zo� Baird, 50 President, Markle Foundation; serves on the boards of The Chubb Corporation,The Brookings Institution, and Save the Children General Counsel, Aetna Life & Casualty Company (now Aetna Inc.) Scandal (“Nannygate”) jettisoned her 1993 attorney general nomination. But she played a key role in Aetna’s $4 billion sale of its property/casualty business to Travelers Group Inc. Baird managed Aetna’s 120 lawyers, as Aetna’s first female VP and GC, until her 1999 move to Markle, which focuses on how technology can address public needs. Due to early deadlines, “Doonesbury” published several comic strips depicting Baird as attorney general.

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