Jurors on Tuesday afternoon deliberated starkly different versions of a criminal case against a woman and two lawyers accused of using a secret video camera to make an illegal recording of former Waffle House CEO Joe Rogers Jr. engaged in a sexual encounter with the woman.

In closing arguments, prosecutors said Rogers’ former housekeeper Mye Brindle and her former lawyers, David Cohen and John Butters, had clearly violated Rogers’ privacy in violation of the law when Brindle used the camera to record herself masturbating her boss in the bedroom of his home.

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