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A former volunteer safety patrol member from Rockland County who pleaded guilty to bribing New York City police officers to get gun permits has been sentenced to nearly three years in prison.

Alex “Shaya” Lichtenstein was sentenced Thursday by Southern District Judge Sidney Stein, who said Lichtenstein must serve two years, eight months incarceration after weakening the faith New York City residents have in their police department. He also must forfeit $230,000.

Lichtenstein said he was “very, very sorry.” The 45-year-old Pomona resident pleaded guilty to bribery charges in November. He admitted participating from 2013 to 2016 in a scheme in which he offered officers thousands of dollars in bribes for each gun license.

The bribes were covered by fees of $10,000 or more paid by clients who got their applications to carry a handgun approved in two months or less. Typically, applications can take up to a year to process. Sometimes, criminal histories were ignored.

The Southern District U.S. Attorney’s Office said Lichenstein had bragged that he had gotten at least 150 licenses for people to carry guns.

Prosecutors said Lichtenstein was a member of the Borough Park Shomrim, a volunteer Orthodox Jewish patrol society that seeks to fight crime and locate missing people.

Assistant U.S. attorneys Russell Capone, Kan Nowaday and Lauren Schorr prosecuted the case.

Attorney Richard Finkel represented Lichtenstein.

A former volunteer safety patrol member from Rockland County who pleaded guilty to bribing New York City police officers to get gun permits has been sentenced to nearly three years in prison.

Alex “Shaya” Lichtenstein was sentenced Thursday by Southern District Judge Sidney Stein, who said Lichtenstein must serve two years, eight months incarceration after weakening the faith New York City residents have in their police department. He also must forfeit $230,000.

Lichtenstein said he was “very, very sorry.” The 45-year-old Pomona resident pleaded guilty to bribery charges in November. He admitted participating from 2013 to 2016 in a scheme in which he offered officers thousands of dollars in bribes for each gun license.

The bribes were covered by fees of $10,000 or more paid by clients who got their applications to carry a handgun approved in two months or less. Typically, applications can take up to a year to process. Sometimes, criminal histories were ignored.

The Southern District U.S. Attorney’s Office said Lichenstein had bragged that he had gotten at least 150 licenses for people to carry guns.

Prosecutors said Lichtenstein was a member of the Borough Park Shomrim, a volunteer Orthodox Jewish patrol society that seeks to fight crime and locate missing people.

Assistant U.S. attorneys Russell Capone, Kan Nowaday and Lauren Schorr prosecuted the case.

Attorney Richard Finkel represented Lichtenstein.