Governor James Hodges of McGuireWoods Consulting.
Governor James Hodges of McGuireWoods Consulting. (Courtesy photo)

Washington Wrap is a weekly roundup of Big Law hires and other Washington, D.C., legal industry news. Read the previous edition here. Send tips and lateral moves to Katelyn Polantz at kpolantz@alm.com.

McGuireWoods is entering a time of transition, with the firm this week naming new management at its McGuireWoods Consulting business, effective in January. Expect change in the law firm’s leadership in the near future, too.

Mark Bowles, a former fundraiser for current Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, and Jim Hodges, the former governor of South Carolina, became chairman and CEO, respectively, of the lobbying subsidiary. Bowles joined the group when it was launched in 1998, and Hodges combined part of his Columbia, South Carolina, boutique with the firm in 2009. Both are partners in the law firm.

The pair succeed outgoing McGuireWoods Consulting chairman Frank Atkinson and CEO L.F. Payne Jr., who remain at the consulting group but will no longer manage. They will still serve on a management liaison committee between the consulting business and the law firm.

Atkinson and Payne had “been talking about it for at least three years, that we needed to look for a transition,” McGuireWoods chairman Richard Cullen, a former Virginia attorney general, said Friday.

Cullen, who has been re-elected to the firm chairmanship every year for a decade, said the law practice side of the firm has also been thinking about succession. “We haven’t announced anything, and aren’t going to announce now,” Cullen said Friday. But “I would think some time in the next year or so, we’ll be talking very seriously about transition for my role and other roles.”

After two decades, Atkinson, Payne and Cullen said McGuireWoods Consulting’s side-by-side business model with the law firm–once a rarity among Washington’s law-and-lobby offerings–still makes sense. “We decided the best way to success was to leave the consultants alone, and let them run their own business,” Cullen said. Clients “love to be able to go to their law firm and have the law firm be able to provide services through an affiliate,” he added.

Bowles and Hodges both have backgrounds in Democratic politics. Yet the consulting group is bipartisan, they said. McGuireWoods is among D.C. firms with well-known Republican ties, and already has hired from and sent a partner to the Trump administration. As for the outgoing leaders, Payne is a former U.S. congressman from Virginia who was a moderate “Blue Dog” Democrat, while Atkinson worked in the Reagan-era Justice Department.

In total, the consulting business has eight state offices (Atlanta; Chicago and Springfield, Illinois; Raleigh, North Carolina; Columbia; Austin, Texas; Richmond and Charlottesville, Virginia), plus international offices in Bucharest and Brussels, and a Washington, D.C., office. Most of the revenue comes from state-level lobbying, the leadership said, such as legislative advocacy in state capitol buildings.

Hodges and Bowles said they hope to expand the business to places where the McGuireWoods law firm has offices but the consulting group still does not. They declined to share specifics. In all, 32 attorneys with the law firm also work with the 118-person consulting group.

So far, the consulting subsidiary has reported federal lobbying revenue of $1.5 million in the first quarter of this year. Major clients include Smithfield Foods Inc. on rulemaking, appropriations and Farm Bill issues; oil and gas exploration company Hunt Consolidated Inc. regarding tax policy and renewable fuel standards; and the National Alliance of Forest Owners regarding taxation. Other clients are Blue Cross Blue Shield, Exxon Mobil and the Washington Redskins, for which the lobbyists approached Congressional members to discuss “team origins, history and traditions.”

McGuireWoods Consulting has announced several other leadership changes within its various practice areas and offices. Those moves elevated Betsy Beamer, Stephen Horton and Christopher Nolen in Richmond, Brad Alexander and Ashley Groome in Georgia, William Boan in South Carolina, Holly Deshields in Texas and Lee Lilley in D.C.

The week’s lateral moves:

•  DLA Piper’s Washington office is on a hiring streak. About two weeks ago, Raphael Larson joined the litigation practice as a partner focused on accountant liability work. He moved from the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. Partner John Rah has joined Larson in the firm’s litigation practice. Rah focuses on health care and life sciences compliance and previously was at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius.

•  Notch yet another cybersecurity specialist hire in Washington. Paul Hastings picked up Robert Silvers, the assistant secretary for cyber policy at the Department of Homeland Security, as a partner. He’ll work in the white-collar defense and privacy and the cybersecurity practices. Among his specialties while in government: security for the internet of things.

•  Brian Boynton, former counselor to U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, rejoined Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr. He’ll be a partner in the government and regulatory litigation group. Previously, he worked in the Office of Legal Counsel at the Department of Justice, and was at Wilmer for an earlier stint from 2002 to 2014.

•  Eversheds Sutherland hired Joseph Hall as an energy and infrastructure partner in Washington. He previously co-chaired Dorsey & Whitney’s energy industry group.

•  Mayer Brown added Gary Wilcox, a tax controversy and transfer pricing partner, in D.C. He moves from PricewaterhouseCoopers. Before that, he was a partner at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius and worked at the Internal Revenue Service.

•  Alexandria-based intellectual property boutique Oblon, McClelland, Maier & Neustadt picked up a Washington IP partner from Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, a firm in the midst of a strategic reinvention. Alexander Hadjis had co-founded the International Trade Commission group at Cadwalader and led it since 2014. Before that, Hadjis co-chaired Morrison & Foerster’s IP practice, a firm he had joined from Dentons-predecessor firm Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal.

•  Wiley Rein nabbed a Federal Communications Commission media bureau chief for its telecom, media and technology practice. William Lake will be consulting counsel at the historic telecom powerhouse firm in D.C.—which says it still has the largest such group in the country. In 2009, he coordinated the digital television transition for the FCC. Before that, he led the communications group at Wilmer.

•  Bracewell hired Hans Dyke as an energy partner in Washington. He previously was at Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer. His clients included investor clubs, global chemical and energy companies and tax equity investors, the firm said.

•  Jenner & Block, no stranger to partnership changes this year, says goodbye to Anton “Tony” Valukas as its chairman. A successor won’t fill the honorary role.

In other D.C.-area industry news:

•  Mark your calendars, fans of fictionalized Big Law drama. John Grisham–of “Pelican Brief,” et al. fame—announced his first book tour in 25 years. He’ll speak and sign books at Politics and Prose in Northwest Washington on June 28.

•  Long overdue, or unduly retaliatory? Kerrie Campbell got kicked out of the partnership of Chadbourne & Parke, the law firm she’s suing for gender discrimination.

•  Dentons faced partner cuts in Washington and other U.S. locales recently.

•  Two Washington-based firms have to print new letterhead. Sanford Heisler added a name partner (again) to become Sanford Heisler Sharp. And Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel now goes by Kellogg, Hansen, Todd, Figel & Frederick.

•  Annie Karni of Politico filleted exactly what Williams & Connolly’s Bob Barnett does for his Washington clients and how the Barnett book deal era may be nearing its end. Still, even at 70 and following a health scare that caused him to shave his head, Barnett is not retiring from the partnership, Karni writes (though he has stepped down from law firm leadership). His current hourly rate? $1,250.

•  The elite eight are back to the number nine. Bask in a fully functioning branch of government with coverage of Justice Neil Gorsuch’s first day on the Supreme Court and his first decision. And here’s a preview of Justice Gorsuch’s week two.

•  You’d think the mansplainers would spare this country’s most accomplished female lawyers? Nope. Justices Sandra Day O’Connor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor are interrupted by their male colleagues a disproportionate amount of time during Supreme Court arguments. Perhaps the greatest offender in 2015 was Justice Anthony Kennedy, who stepped on Sotomayor’s words 15 times.

•  #AppellateTwitter’s Raffi Melkonian compiled this handy list where you can find judges uninterrupted on Twitter.

•  The New York Times and ProPublica looked into how the Trump administration has appointed corporate lobbyists to agency roles in which they will regulate the industries from which they came. The stories acknowledge that the revolving door isn’t new in town, but may violate President Donald Trump’s own ethics policies. Among several people mentioned, the Times report singles out Lance Leggitt, who chaired Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz’s federal health policy group since 2006 and became chief of staff to Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price last month.

•  Where are the new U.S. attorney appointees?

•  The legal industry’s “merger mania” has permeated the nonprofit legal services realm. The Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights & Urban Affairs and the D.C. Employment Justice Center combined on April 17. The new organization will use the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs name. Generally, the lawyers’ committee group is known for litigation and policy work on employment, housing, prisoners’ rights and immigrant rights, while the Employment Justice Center runs clinics for workers’ rights seven times a month. The employment clinics for low-income workers will continue as scheduled, in their same locations. The lawyers’ committee co-chairs are Jennifer Levy of Kirkland & Ellis and Steven Hollman of Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton, while Omar Vincent Melehy of Melehy & Associates led the Employment Justice Center.

•  The DC Bar Foundation said it handed out $4.55 million for legal services projects through its Access to Justice grants program. The grants go to 33 projects in the District of Columbia focused on underserved areas, housing matters and for a shared legal interpreter bank.

Washington Wrap is a weekly roundup of Big Law hires and other Washington, D.C., legal industry news. Read the previous edition here. Send tips and lateral moves to Katelyn Polantz at kpolantz@alm.com.

McGuireWoods is entering a time of transition, with the firm this week naming new management at its McGuireWoods Consulting business, effective in January. Expect change in the law firm’s leadership in the near future, too.

Mark Bowles, a former fundraiser for current Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, and Jim Hodges, the former governor of South Carolina, became chairman and CEO, respectively, of the lobbying subsidiary. Bowles joined the group when it was launched in 1998, and Hodges combined part of his Columbia, South Carolina, boutique with the firm in 2009. Both are partners in the law firm.

The pair succeed outgoing McGuireWoods Consulting chairman Frank Atkinson and CEO L.F. Payne Jr., who remain at the consulting group but will no longer manage. They will still serve on a management liaison committee between the consulting business and the law firm.

Atkinson and Payne had “been talking about it for at least three years, that we needed to look for a transition,” McGuireWoods chairman Richard Cullen, a former Virginia attorney general, said Friday.

Cullen, who has been re-elected to the firm chairmanship every year for a decade, said the law practice side of the firm has also been thinking about succession. “We haven’t announced anything, and aren’t going to announce now,” Cullen said Friday. But “I would think some time in the next year or so, we’ll be talking very seriously about transition for my role and other roles.”

After two decades, Atkinson, Payne and Cullen said McGuireWoods Consulting ’s side-by-side business model with the law firm–once a rarity among Washington’s law-and-lobby offerings–still makes sense. “We decided the best way to success was to leave the consultants alone, and let them run their own business,” Cullen said. Clients “love to be able to go to their law firm and have the law firm be able to provide services through an affiliate,” he added.

Bowles and Hodges both have backgrounds in Democratic politics. Yet the consulting group is bipartisan, they said. McGuireWoods is among D.C. firms with well-known Republican ties, and already has hired from and sent a partner to the Trump administration. As for the outgoing leaders, Payne is a former U.S. congressman from Virginia who was a moderate “Blue Dog” Democrat, while Atkinson worked in the Reagan-era Justice Department.

In total, the consulting business has eight state offices (Atlanta; Chicago and Springfield, Illinois; Raleigh, North Carolina; Columbia; Austin, Texas; Richmond and Charlottesville, Virginia ), plus international offices in Bucharest and Brussels, and a Washington, D.C., office. Most of the revenue comes from state-level lobbying, the leadership said, such as legislative advocacy in state capitol buildings.

Hodges and Bowles said they hope to expand the business to places where the McGuireWoods law firm has offices but the consulting group still does not. They declined to share specifics. In all, 32 attorneys with the law firm also work with the 118-person consulting group.

So far, the consulting subsidiary has reported federal lobbying revenue of $1.5 million in the first quarter of this year. Major clients include Smithfield Foods Inc. on rulemaking, appropriations and Farm Bill issues; oil and gas exploration company Hunt Consolidated Inc. regarding tax policy and renewable fuel standards; and the National Alliance of Forest Owners regarding taxation. Other clients are Blue Cross Blue Shield, Exxon Mobil and the Washington Redskins, for which the lobbyists approached Congressional members to discuss “team origins, history and traditions.”

McGuireWoods Consulting has announced several other leadership changes within its various practice areas and offices. Those moves elevated Betsy Beamer, Stephen Horton and Christopher Nolen in Richmond, Brad Alexander and Ashley Groome in Georgia, William Boan in South Carolina, Holly Deshields in Texas and Lee Lilley in D.C.

The week’s lateral moves:

•   DLA Piper ’s Washington office is on a hiring streak. About two weeks ago, Raphael Larson joined the litigation practice as a partner focused on accountant liability work. He moved from the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. Partner John Rah has joined Larson in the firm’s litigation practice. Rah focuses on health care and life sciences compliance and previously was at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius .

•  Notch yet another cybersecurity specialist hire in Washington. Paul Hastings picked up Robert Silvers, the assistant secretary for cyber policy at the Department of Homeland Security, as a partner. He’ll work in the white-collar defense and privacy and the cybersecurity practices. Among his specialties while in government: security for the internet of things.

•  Brian Boynton, former counselor to U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, rejoined Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr. He’ll be a partner in the government and regulatory litigation group. Previously, he worked in the Office of Legal Counsel at the Department of Justice, and was at Wilmer for an earlier stint from 2002 to 2014.

•   Eversheds Sutherland hired Joseph Hall as an energy and infrastructure partner in Washington. He previously co-chaired Dorsey & Whitney ’s energy industry group.

•   Mayer Brown added Gary Wilcox, a tax controversy and transfer pricing partner, in D.C. He moves from PricewaterhouseCoopers. Before that, he was a partner at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius and worked at the Internal Revenue Service.

•  Alexandria-based intellectual property boutique Oblon, McClelland, Maier & Neustadt picked up a Washington IP partner from Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft , a firm in the midst of a strategic reinvention. Alexander Hadjis had co-founded the International Trade Commission group at Cadwalader and led it since 2014. Before that, Hadjis co-chaired Morrison & Foerster ’s IP practice, a firm he had joined from Dentons-predecessor firm Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal .

•   Wiley Rein nabbed a Federal Communications Commission media bureau chief for its telecom, media and technology practice. William Lake will be consulting counsel at the historic telecom powerhouse firm in D.C.—which says it still has the largest such group in the country. In 2009, he coordinated the digital television transition for the FCC. Before that, he led the communications group at Wilmer.

•  Bracewell hired Hans Dyke as an energy partner in Washington. He previously was at Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer . His clients included investor clubs, global chemical and energy companies and tax equity investors, the firm said.

•   Jenner & Block , no stranger to partnership changes this year, says goodbye to Anton “Tony” Valukas as its chairman. A successor won’t fill the honorary role.

In other D.C.-area industry news:

•  Mark your calendars, fans of fictionalized Big Law drama. John Grisham–of “Pelican Brief,” et al. fame—announced his first book tour in 25 years. He’ll speak and sign books at Politics and Prose in Northwest Washington on June 28.

•  Long overdue, or unduly retaliatory? Kerrie Campbell got kicked out of the partnership of Chadbourne & Parke , the law firm she’s suing for gender discrimination.

•   Dentons faced partner cuts in Washington and other U.S. locales recently.

•  Two Washington-based firms have to print new letterhead. Sanford Heisler added a name partner (again) to become Sanford Heisler Sharp. And Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans & Figel now goes by Kellogg, Hansen, Todd, Figel & Frederick.

•  Annie Karni of Politico filleted exactly what Williams & Connolly ’s Bob Barnett does for his Washington clients and how the Barnett book deal era may be nearing its end. Still, even at 70 and following a health scare that caused him to shave his head, Barnett is not retiring from the partnership, Karni writes (though he has stepped down from law firm leadership). His current hourly rate? $1,250.

•  The elite eight are back to the number nine. Bask in a fully functioning branch of government with coverage of Justice Neil Gorsuch’s first day on the Supreme Court and his first decision. And here’s a preview of Justice Gorsuch’s week two.

•  You’d think the mansplainers would spare this country’s most accomplished female lawyers? Nope. Justices Sandra Day O’Connor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg , Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor are interrupted by their male colleagues a disproportionate amount of time during Supreme Court arguments. Perhaps the greatest offender in 2015 was Justice Anthony Kennedy, who stepped on Sotomayor’s words 15 times.

•  #AppellateTwitter’s Raffi Melkonian compiled this handy list where you can find judges uninterrupted on Twitter.

•  The New York Times and ProPublica looked into how the Trump administration has appointed corporate lobbyists to agency roles in which they will regulate the industries from which they came. The stories acknowledge that the revolving door isn’t new in town, but may violate President Donald Trump’s own ethics policies. Among several people mentioned, the Times report singles out Lance Leggitt, who chaired Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz ’s federal health policy group since 2006 and became chief of staff to Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price last month.

•  Where are the new U.S. attorney appointees?

•  The legal industry’s “merger mania” has permeated the nonprofit legal services realm. The Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights & Urban Affairs and the D.C. Employment Justice Center combined on April 17. The new organization will use the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs name. Generally, the lawyers’ committee group is known for litigation and policy work on employment, housing, prisoners’ rights and immigrant rights, while the Employment Justice Center runs clinics for workers’ rights seven times a month. The employment clinics for low-income workers will continue as scheduled, in their same locations. The lawyers’ committee co-chairs are Jennifer Levy of Kirkland & Ellis and Steven Hollman of Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton , while Omar Vincent Melehy of Melehy & Associates led the Employment Justice Center.

•  The DC Bar Foundation said it handed out $4.55 million for legal services projects through its Access to Justice grants program. The grants go to 33 projects in the District of Columbia focused on underserved areas, housing matters and for a shared legal interpreter bank.