(Photo: Step via Wikimedia Commons)

Yale Law School is bolstering its human rights programs with a $13 million donation from the Robina Foundation, a Minnesota-based philanthropy focused on social issues.

In addition to the foundation’s gift, the school has received a $5 million matching gift from an anonymous donor and has committed to raising $1 million more to endow the school’s existing human rights endeavors.

The $19 million combined funding will create the Robina Human Rights Initiative Endowment Fund and establish the Binger Clinical Professorship in Human Rights, which is named for the late president and chairman of Honeywell Inc., James Binger. He established the Robina Foundation in 2004, shortly before his death.

“These new gifts will ensure that the law school will always have a faculty member to teach the human rights clinic, that students will continue to have life-changing summer human rights experiences, that our graduates will have opportunities, early in their careers, to contribute to the valuable human rights work of key international institutions,” said professor James Silk, who leads the school’s human rights clinic and has been named the inaugural Binger professor.

The new funding endows a variety of human rights programs established through earlier Robina Foundation gifts totaling $22 million since 2008. Thus far, the Robina Human Rights Initiative has funded scholarships for 76 law students with an interest in human rights; sent 284 into summer human rights internships around the globe; and offered post-graduate human rights fellowship to 30 Yale Law alumni.

Donations from the Robina Foundation have also been used to help graduates in human rights jobs repay their student loans, and has brought human rights leaders and scholars to the New Haven campus to deliver talks and conduct research.

Binger graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1941 and worked at the firm now called Dorsey & Whitney before joining Honeywell and rising to the top of the corporate ranks.

In addition to donations to Yale, his foundation has been generous with Binger’s alma mater. Minnesota Law established the Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice in 2011 with a nearly $9 million gift. Overall, the Minneapolis law school has received more than $27 million from the foundation since 2009.

Contact Karen Sloan at ksloan@alm.com. On Twitter: @KarenSloanNLJ.

Yale Law School is bolstering its human rights programs with a $13 million donation from the Robina Foundation, a Minnesota-based philanthropy focused on social issues.

In addition to the foundation’s gift, the school has received a $5 million matching gift from an anonymous donor and has committed to raising $1 million more to endow the school’s existing human rights endeavors.

The $19 million combined funding will create the Robina Human Rights Initiative Endowment Fund and establish the Binger Clinical Professorship in Human Rights, which is named for the late president and chairman of Honeywell Inc. , James Binger. He established the Robina Foundation in 2004, shortly before his death.

“These new gifts will ensure that the law school will always have a faculty member to teach the human rights clinic, that students will continue to have life-changing summer human rights experiences, that our graduates will have opportunities, early in their careers, to contribute to the valuable human rights work of key international institutions,” said professor James Silk, who leads the school’s human rights clinic and has been named the inaugural Binger professor.

The new funding endows a variety of human rights programs established through earlier Robina Foundation gifts totaling $22 million since 2008. Thus far, the Robina Human Rights Initiative has funded scholarships for 76 law students with an interest in human rights; sent 284 into summer human rights internships around the globe; and offered post-graduate human rights fellowship to 30 Yale Law alumni.

Donations from the Robina Foundation have also been used to help graduates in human rights jobs repay their student loans, and has brought human rights leaders and scholars to the New Haven campus to deliver talks and conduct research.

Binger graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1941 and worked at the firm now called Dorsey & Whitney before joining Honeywell and rising to the top of the corporate ranks.

In addition to donations to Yale, his foundation has been generous with Binger’s alma mater. Minnesota Law established the Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice in 2011 with a nearly $9 million gift. Overall, the Minneapolis law school has received more than $27 million from the foundation since 2009.

Contact Karen Sloan at ksloan@alm.com. On Twitter: @KarenSloanNLJ.