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Data can reside in the strangest of places, far flung from other relevant information integral to a matter. With all eyes on analytics, often overlooked by technologists is getting useful data all under one roof. But Blackdot Solutions’ integration of its Videris investigations software with kCura’s Relativity ecosystem is looking to change the dynamic, bringing under one roof data from both outside and inside an organization for management and visualized analysis.

Here’s a look at how the move tries tackling this task:

Parties at hand: A U.K.-based tech outfit, Blackdot Solutions develops open source investigation software, which pulls unstructured data from various online sources such as social media and corporate records. Its Videris technology provides visual representations of such data so users can connect dots during analysis.

kCura, meanwhile, is the company behind the popular e-discovery ecosystem Relativity, which the company claims is in use by over 12,000 organizations in over 40 countries, including Fortune 100 companies and the U.S. Department of Justice. In addition to Videris, kCura partners with over 70 organizations to develop custom applications and products, as well as integrate platforms.

Applicable for: Comparing data sets for various tasks, but the companies are promoting the capabilities particularly in the context of an investigation of public entities, internal investigations, or litigation. In this scenario, a user can take public information about a company from social media, corporate records, etc., then pull data from their Relativity database for analysis.

Who it serves: The integration’s primary goal is to reach the legal sector, though it can in theory be used to any organization that, as Blackdot executive director Zachary Brech puts it, “wants to do more with a large discrete data sets.” On Videris’ end, these clients span “the full spectrum of organizations who routinely carry out professional research and investigation,” including banks, corporate security departments, law firms, and charities.

Integration in Action: Let’s say a user is searching for an individual within a data set in Relativity. The integration allows for the exporting of this person’s information to Videris, where the technology scours the Internet for results around things like media coverage, corporate holdings, and so on, explained Brech.

Pricing: In order to utilize this joint offering, an organization must have a Videris license, which starts at $150,000 a year. Additionally, users must also have a Relativity license. With these two prerequisites met, there’s no additional cost.

Benefits unpacked: Both kCura and Blackdot boast speed and efficiency as the selling points of this integration, underscoring the cumbersome nature of toggling  between platforms to analyze different  data sets for a single investigation.

“This can help very quickly to corroborate or contradict information in an organization’s internal data set and open up new lines of inquiry for the user,” Brech said. “A name could be discovered from research online in Videris which can then be cross-searched with the entire contents of the e-discovery database to enable a multi-layered picture of the person or company to be built up in minutes.”  

What this means for users: kCura vice president of engineering Perry Merchant told LTN that the integration enables users “to rapidly build a comprehensive understanding of people, companies, and events by analyzing their Relativity database alongside data pulled from the internet in Videris,” and thus “uncover the truth  in their data.”

In Brech’s view, the integration “adds significant information advantage to users and enables them to broaden the field on which a particular matter is being fought.”

“Users can get much smarter much faster. It does not remove or replace the need to commission specialist investigation of the leads contained within. What it does is allow users to do more with the information themselves than ever before,” he added.

Copyright Legaltech News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Data can reside in the strangest of places, far flung from other relevant information integral to a matter. With all eyes on analytics, often overlooked by technologists is getting useful data all under one roof. But Blackdot Solutions’ integration of its Videris investigations software with kCura’s Relativity ecosystem is looking to change the dynamic, bringing under one roof data from both outside and inside an organization for management and visualized analysis.

Here’s a look at how the move tries tackling this task:

Parties at hand: A U.K.-based tech outfit, Blackdot Solutions develops open source investigation software, which pulls unstructured data from various online sources such as social media and corporate records. Its Videris technology provides visual representations of such data so users can connect dots during analysis.

kCura, meanwhile, is the company behind the popular e-discovery ecosystem Relativity, which the company claims is in use by over 12,000 organizations in over 40 countries, including Fortune 100 companies and the U.S. Department of Justice. In addition to Videris, kCura partners with over 70 organizations to develop custom applications and products, as well as integrate platforms.

Applicable for: Comparing data sets for various tasks, but the companies are promoting the capabilities particularly in the context of an investigation of public entities, internal investigations, or litigation. In this scenario, a user can take public information about a company from social media, corporate records, etc., then pull data from their Relativity database for analysis.

Who it serves: The integration’s primary goal is to reach the legal sector, though it can in theory be used to any organization that, as Blackdot executive director Zachary Brech puts it, “wants to do more with a large discrete data sets.” On Videris’ end, these clients span “the full spectrum of organizations who routinely carry out professional research and investigation,” including banks, corporate security departments, law firms, and charities.

Integration in Action: Let’s say a user is searching for an individual within a data set in Relativity. The integration allows for the exporting of this person’s information to Videris, where the technology scours the Internet for results around things like media coverage, corporate holdings, and so on, explained Brech.

Pricing: In order to utilize this joint offering, an organization must have a Videris license, which starts at $150,000 a year. Additionally, users must also have a Relativity license. With these two prerequisites met, there’s no additional cost.

Benefits unpacked: Both kCura and Blackdot boast speed and efficiency as the selling points of this integration, underscoring the cumbersome nature of toggling  between platforms to analyze different  data sets for a single investigation.

“This can help very quickly to corroborate or contradict information in an organization’s internal data set and open up new lines of inquiry for the user,” Brech said. “A name could be discovered from research online in Videris which can then be cross-searched with the entire contents of the e-discovery database to enable a multi-layered picture of the person or company to be built up in minutes.”  

What this means for users: kCura vice president of engineering Perry Merchant told LTN that the integration enables users “to rapidly build a comprehensive understanding of people, companies, and events by analyzing their Relativity database alongside data pulled from the internet in Videris,” and thus “uncover the truth  in their data.”

In Brech’s view, the integration “adds significant information advantage to users and enables them to broaden the field on which a particular matter is being fought.”

“Users can get much smarter much faster. It does not remove or replace the need to commission specialist investigation of the leads contained within. What it does is allow users to do more with the information themselves than ever before,” he added.

Copyright Legaltech News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.