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The latest effort to scale up professional services in e-discovery firms comes from Franklin Data, who last week acquired the assets of Texas-based consulting group Scarab Consulting. A statement released by Franklin notes the transaction will give the company access to Scarab’s Relativity data hosting environment in addition to its operations in both its Texas and New York offices.

Franklin Data CEO Matthew Blake said that while the company cut its teeth on the data science side of e-discovery, it was looking to bolster its professional services.

“Adding good talent is certainly at the forefront of being a leader in this space, but also having really good clients that get it, that understand there are ways to be creative and innovative around the course of discovery,” Blake said.

The acquisition comes on the heels of a year full of strategic partnerships between e-discovery providers and consultant services, evidenced most recently by the collaboration between Pricewaterhouse Coopers and Wolters Kluwer.

Scarab’s Relativity environment was another big selling point for Franklin Data. Blake said that although Franklin was previously a Relativity partner, they’d left the environment a few years back in favor of a network of strategic partners.

“Through partnering with strategic partners, we had somewhat limited control over the information, the security, the onboarding of new clients, and the management of new data. Certain things were outside of our control,” he said of the strategic plan.

Blake also added that control and cost-effectiveness were the biggest drivers in considering Scarab’s Relativity environment. The company ultimately valued the opportunity to retain greater oversight of their data.

“We’re very much thinking about information protection and data security at all times, and we missed out on that opportunity over the last few years by not controlling that environment internally,” Blake said.

Blake noted that geography and market also featured heavily in the decision to acquire Scarab.

“They had done a good job in expanding in parts of the country where we wanted to be and expand our opportunity, which includes New York City. New York is a really important market for us,” Blake said, adding that the city’s longstanding roots to financial services organizations made the market particularly attractive.

Prior to acquisition, Scarab was set to launch a cybersecurity service brand called SecurityRenewed. Franklin plans to launch the service as part of its brand offerings, which Blake believes can provide a nice software pairing to the company’s current managed security services offering.

“SecurityRenewed is a productized brand that will allow us to grab the market by that way,” Blake said.

Blake noted that this acquisition certainly isn’t Franklin’s last, with two more acquisitions set to be announced in early 2017. He said that the company is leveraging these acquisitions and its partnerships to keep pace with the industry at large.

“Overall the market is growing. Clients are continuing to acquire services around e-discovery and manager security services in modern ways. It’s Franklin Data’s job to continue to provide those services to its clients in an efficient and economical way,” he said.

“I think we’re on top of something now. We’re really starting to hit our stride,” Blake added. 

The latest effort to scale up professional services in e-discovery firms comes from Franklin Data, who last week acquired the assets of Texas-based consulting group Scarab Consulting. A statement released by Franklin notes the transaction will give the company access to Scarab’s Relativity data hosting environment in addition to its operations in both its Texas and New York offices.

Franklin Data CEO Matthew Blake said that while the company cut its teeth on the data science side of e-discovery, it was looking to bolster its professional services.

“Adding good talent is certainly at the forefront of being a leader in this space, but also having really good clients that get it, that understand there are ways to be creative and innovative around the course of discovery,” Blake said.

The acquisition comes on the heels of a year full of strategic partnerships between e-discovery providers and consultant services, evidenced most recently by the collaboration between Pricewaterhouse Coopers and Wolters Kluwer.

Scarab’s Relativity environment was another big selling point for Franklin Data. Blake said that although Franklin was previously a Relativity partner, they’d left the environment a few years back in favor of a network of strategic partners.

“Through partnering with strategic partners, we had somewhat limited control over the information, the security, the onboarding of new clients, and the management of new data. Certain things were outside of our control,” he said of the strategic plan.

Blake also added that control and cost-effectiveness were the biggest drivers in considering Scarab’s Relativity environment. The company ultimately valued the opportunity to retain greater oversight of their data.

“We’re very much thinking about information protection and data security at all times, and we missed out on that opportunity over the last few years by not controlling that environment internally,” Blake said.

Blake noted that geography and market also featured heavily in the decision to acquire Scarab.

“They had done a good job in expanding in parts of the country where we wanted to be and expand our opportunity, which includes New York City. New York is a really important market for us,” Blake said, adding that the city’s longstanding roots to financial services organizations made the market particularly attractive.

Prior to acquisition, Scarab was set to launch a cybersecurity service brand called SecurityRenewed. Franklin plans to launch the service as part of its brand offerings, which Blake believes can provide a nice software pairing to the company’s current managed security services offering.

“SecurityRenewed is a productized brand that will allow us to grab the market by that way,” Blake said.

Blake noted that this acquisition certainly isn’t Franklin’s last, with two more acquisitions set to be announced in early 2017. He said that the company is leveraging these acquisitions and its partnerships to keep pace with the industry at large.

“Overall the market is growing. Clients are continuing to acquire services around e-discovery and manager security services in modern ways. It’s Franklin Data’s job to continue to provide those services to its clients in an efficient and economical way,” he said.

“I think we’re on top of something now. We’re really starting to hit our stride,” Blake added.