Laurel Boatright (center) leads the FBI dancers in a show-stopping number, Upload Junk, loosely based on Bruno Mars' UpTown Funk Kevin Wilson ( not pictured) plays FBI Agent Bruno Mars.
Laurel Boatright (center) leads the FBI dancers in a show-stopping number, Upload Junk, loosely based on Bruno Mars’ UpTown Funk Kevin Wilson ( not pictured) plays FBI Agent Bruno Mars. (Rose Mascotti)

Leaked videos, computer hacks, spoiler millennial voters and multiple FBI investigations swirling around a hotly-contested election make the Atlanta Bar Association’s latest all-lawyer comedy musical, “A Courthouse Line XII: Mock the Vote” strangely true to life—but a lot more fun to watch.

“Mock the Vote,” playing this weekend only, matches the U.S. presidential election for intrigue and drama—but with singing and dancing. What’s not to like about a show whose rousing opening number is a paean to litigating?

Cathy O’Neil, by day a partner in the special matters practice at King & Spalding, came out of retirement to write and direct one of the most entertaining Bard shows yet, ably assisted by Brian Johnson of Drew Eckl & Farnum. O’Neil’s prior experience as a federal prosecutor comes in handy for a storyline that culminates in a joint investigation by the FBI and the Georgia bar’s ethics watchdog, the, erm, Taint Commission, into the leaks, hacks and general skullduggery by the candidates and their close associates.

Dax Lopez, by day a DeKalb County State Court judge, does an uncanny Trump impersonation as an ambitious personal injury lawyer, Ronald McDowell, who is vying for the coveted position of Georgia bar president and will stop at nothing to win. McDowell hires some bumbling private investigators to dig up any dirt he can on his two opponents, and shenanigans ensue.

An enormously talented cast and crew of about 75 lawyers and judges have spent months on the show, with the indulgence of their families and law partners. A surprisingly large number, it turns out, have hidden pasts in musical theater.

Solo practitioner Patricia Roy gives a hilariously over-the-top performance as McDowell’s opponent Nancy Rosen Rosen, who’s just discovered her dearly departed husband, Mort (Jeff Brickman), had a secret second family—living, gasp, OTP in Snellville. “She’s an adulterer—and a bigamist,” McDowell proclaims gleefully. Both families lawyer up in a heated dispute over Mort’s will.

Alan Bakowski of Troutman Sanders is convincingly squeaky-clean as McDowell’s earnest opponent Alan Smith, who is too preoccupied with a high-stakes trial that’s taken Atlanta by storm to see that his partners at Blair Underwood & Smith are running a secret gambling ring. It started with the office NCAA pool and now they’re wagering on ponies, fantasy football—and Smith.

Criminal defense lawyer Don Samuel does a memorable turn as Smith’s client, hapless TV weatherman Hail Storm. In a Gawkeresque situation, SneakPeeps.com posts a leaked video that exposes Storm performing a very un-P.C. rain dance in full Native American regalia. Storm’s name is now mud and he’s suing SneakPeeps.

The FBI and the Taint Commission start investigating just about everybody.
Arrests and interrogations ensue—plus Broadway-worthy song and dance numbers. Courtney McBurney and Rick McMurtry show phenomenal singing chops and a gift for intrigue as Alan Smith’s shady partners, Blair and Underwood, in “Somebody to Blame” to the tune of Queen’s “Somebody to Love.”

The FBI Dancers acquit themselves splendidly, led by Laurel Boatright as Agent Scully. Boatright, a federal prosecutor by day, is also the show’s very able dance captain.

In a scene at the FBI offices, Vernon Strickland as Commissioner Goodell performs an interrogation-stopping solo of “This Is Quite Suspicious” to the tune of the Stevie Wonder classic “Superstition.” Not to be outdone, Maggie Vath and Melanie Paul vigorously advocate for their client with a criminal defense-specific rendition of the Meghan Trainor hit “NO” against Boatright and Marc Clark as Commissioner Gordon.

There are 17 amazing numbers in all, abetted by a witty book full of Atlanta in-jokesincluding a shout-out to Murder Krogerand cameos by Georgia Supreme Court Justice David Nahmias and other notables. Musical director and keyboardist, Norman Barnett, does a phenomenal job keeping it all uptempo.

Who wins the bar election? Does the FBI indict anybody? And does Hail Storm prevail in his leaked video suit against SneakPeeps.com? Find out this weekend.

“Mock the Vote” runs Nov. 10 through Nov. 12. Shows are at 8 p.m. with a noon matinee on Nov. 12 at SCADshow at 173 14th Street N.E. Tickets are $35 and benefit the bar’s charity arm, the Atlanta Bar Foundation. They may be purchased at Scadshow.com.

Leaked videos, computer hacks, spoiler millennial voters and multiple FBI investigations swirling around a hotly-contested election make the Atlanta Bar Association’s latest all-lawyer comedy musical, “A Courthouse Line XII: Mock the Vote” strangely true to life—but a lot more fun to watch.

“Mock the Vote,” playing this weekend only, matches the U.S. presidential election for intrigue and drama—but with singing and dancing. What’s not to like about a show whose rousing opening number is a paean to litigating?

Cathy O’Neil, by day a partner in the special matters practice at King & Spalding, came out of retirement to write and direct one of the most entertaining Bard shows yet, ably assisted by Brian Johnson of Drew Eckl & Farnum. O’Neil’s prior experience as a federal prosecutor comes in handy for a storyline that culminates in a joint investigation by the FBI and the Georgia bar’s ethics watchdog, the, erm, Taint Commission, into the leaks, hacks and general skullduggery by the candidates and their close associates.

Dax Lopez, by day a DeKalb County State Court judge, does an uncanny Trump impersonation as an ambitious personal injury lawyer, Ronald McDowell, who is vying for the coveted position of Georgia bar president and will stop at nothing to win. McDowell hires some bumbling private investigators to dig up any dirt he can on his two opponents, and shenanigans ensue.

An enormously talented cast and crew of about 75 lawyers and judges have spent months on the show, with the indulgence of their families and law partners. A surprisingly large number, it turns out, have hidden pasts in musical theater.

Solo practitioner Patricia Roy gives a hilariously over-the-top performance as McDowell’s opponent Nancy Rosen Rosen, who’s just discovered her dearly departed husband, Mort (Jeff Brickman), had a secret second family—living, gasp, OTP in Snellville. “She’s an adulterer—and a bigamist,” McDowell proclaims gleefully. Both families lawyer up in a heated dispute over Mort’s will.

Alan Bakowski of Troutman Sanders is convincingly squeaky-clean as McDowell’s earnest opponent Alan Smith, who is too preoccupied with a high-stakes trial that’s taken Atlanta by storm to see that his partners at Blair Underwood & Smith are running a secret gambling ring. It started with the office NCAA pool and now they’re wagering on ponies, fantasy football—and Smith.

Criminal defense lawyer Don Samuel does a memorable turn as Smith’s client, hapless TV weatherman Hail Storm. In a Gawkeresque situation, SneakPeeps.com posts a leaked video that exposes Storm performing a very un-P.C. rain dance in full Native American regalia. Storm’s name is now mud and he’s suing SneakPeeps.

The FBI and the Taint Commission start investigating just about everybody.
Arrests and interrogations ensue—plus Broadway-worthy song and dance numbers. Courtney McBurney and Rick McMurtry show phenomenal singing chops and a gift for intrigue as Alan Smith’s shady partners, Blair and Underwood, in “Somebody to Blame” to the tune of Queen’s “Somebody to Love.”

The FBI Dancers acquit themselves splendidly, led by Laurel Boatright as Agent Scully. Boatright, a federal prosecutor by day, is also the show’s very able dance captain.

In a scene at the FBI offices, Vernon Strickland as Commissioner Goodell performs an interrogation-stopping solo of “This Is Quite Suspicious” to the tune of the Stevie Wonder classic “Superstition.” Not to be outdone, Maggie Vath and Melanie Paul vigorously advocate for their client with a criminal defense-specific rendition of the Meghan Trainor hit “NO” against Boatright and Marc Clark as Commissioner Gordon.

There are 17 amazing numbers in all, abetted by a witty book full of Atlanta in-jokesincluding a shout-out to Murder Kroger and cameos by Georgia Supreme Court Justice David Nahmias and other notables. Musical director and keyboardist, Norman Barnett, does a phenomenal job keeping it all uptempo.

Who wins the bar election? Does the FBI indict anybody? And does Hail Storm prevail in his leaked video suit against SneakPeeps.com? Find out this weekend.

“Mock the Vote” runs Nov. 10 through Nov. 12. Shows are at 8 p.m. with a noon matinee on Nov. 12 at SCADshow at 173 14th Street N.E. Tickets are $35 and benefit the bar’s charity arm, the Atlanta Bar Foundation. They may be purchased at Scadshow.com.