Mark Dubois
Mark Dubois ()

Like him or hate him (the Republic seems to be evenly split on that issue), you have to admit that President Trump’s blunderbuss approach to the presidency has created a huge interest among the governed in what’s happening in the government. We’ve gone from “No Drama Obama” to “Donald the Disruptor.” I’ve even gone so far as to start following him on “the” Twitter (both @realdonaldtrump and @potus), the first time I have ever used the thing. It’s not that I don’t trust the “liberal” (so dishonest and unfair?) press; it’s just that they only report a small percentage of the supreme leader’s overnight rantings. I have a desperate craving for a full serving.

Yes, many believe that quiet competence or mild incompetence excused by best intentions (Obama and Bush II) may be preferable to the Silvio Berlusconi approach, which involves, in equal parts: ruling, partying and self-dealing, but I think the country is strong enough, at least for a while, to let the new administration get its legs and, just maybe, settle down a bit and get serious.

Who would have thought that I would be reading Marbury v. Madison or Youngstown Sheet & Tube v. Sawyer over my morning granola, or over lunch plowing through monographs and law review articles on the use and abuse of executive orders since Lincoln tried to suspend the writ of habeas corpus during the Civil War?

Suddenly my wife is impressed when I predict that the Ninth Circuit (which some friends tell me includes Cuba) will uphold the stay on the immigration (Muslim?) ban, which is not a ban, just something that was a ban until we realized that we could not call it a ban, and then we called it something different. Really, that one was not rocket science, but I’ll take the credit anyway.

Did the CIA break the law when they outed Gen. Flynn for calling the Russian ambassador before the inauguration? Did Flynn violate the Lanham Act when he did so? There’s a wonderful ironic twist to the fact that the act prohibits not only correspondence but also intercourse with foreign powers, vis-a-vis the supposed peccadillos of certain high officials in Moscow hotels with Russian “hostesses.”

You’ve got to admit that the scenes of Republican members of Congress bounding out of the back doors of convention halls, pursued by screaming constituents unhappy that they might lose their much-hated Obamacare insurance, belong on “America’s Funniest Home Videos.” I think they forgot the well-known American rule that as much as any citizen hates any or all benefits conferred on others, they will kill to keep anything they enjoy themselves.

I don’t know about you, but I thought that Dick Blumenthal outing Neil Gorsuch’s remark that judges really don’t like it when politicians take shots at courts was kind of unfair. Really, did anyone doubt that’s how he felt? The “Notorious RBG” could have told you as much. I am willing to give Gorsuch some wiggle room, seeing as he is a double black diamond skier. That’s way cooler than Scalia shooting pigeons or Cheney shooting hunting pals in the face.

And poor Kellyanne Conway (also a lawyer, don’t forget). Is she going to get hauled into disciplinary court for shilling Ivanka Trump’s overpriced, made-in-China shoes and handbags during a CNN interview? Come on! She was just supporting a sister.

I’m sorry if this piece is a bit short, but Sean Spicer’s daily exorcism is coming on soon, and I have to freshen up before it starts. I can’t miss a minute of the rage, the malapropisms, and the circular logic. He’s approaching the point where he’s now channeling Melissa McCarthy the way Sarah Palin channeled Tina Fey. Life imitates art, and you can’t tell them apart.

I heard Jon Stewart posit the other day that all of this craziness is good, and I think he’s right. It’s going to make a lot of people much more aware of their rights, engaged in the process, and willing to engage on a whole range of topics that hitherto were the province of academics and wonks. I gotta go! Sean’s on and he’s mad.

Like him or hate him (the Republic seems to be evenly split on that issue), you have to admit that President Trump’s blunderbuss approach to the presidency has created a huge interest among the governed in what’s happening in the government. We’ve gone from “No Drama Obama” to “Donald the Disruptor.” I’ve even gone so far as to start following him on “the” Twitter (both @realdonaldtrump and @potus), the first time I have ever used the thing. It’s not that I don’t trust the “liberal” (so dishonest and unfair?) press; it’s just that they only report a small percentage of the supreme leader’s overnight rantings. I have a desperate craving for a full serving.

Yes, many believe that quiet competence or mild incompetence excused by best intentions (Obama and Bush II) may be preferable to the Silvio Berlusconi approach, which involves, in equal parts: ruling, partying and self-dealing, but I think the country is strong enough, at least for a while, to let the new administration get its legs and, just maybe, settle down a bit and get serious.

Who would have thought that I would be reading Marbury v. Madison or Youngstown Sheet & Tube v. Sawyer over my morning granola, or over lunch plowing through monographs and law review articles on the use and abuse of executive orders since Lincoln tried to suspend the writ of habeas corpus during the Civil War?

Suddenly my wife is impressed when I predict that the Ninth Circuit (which some friends tell me includes Cuba) will uphold the stay on the immigration (Muslim?) ban, which is not a ban, just something that was a ban until we realized that we could not call it a ban, and then we called it something different. Really, that one was not rocket science, but I’ll take the credit anyway.

Did the CIA break the law when they outed Gen. Flynn for calling the Russian ambassador before the inauguration? Did Flynn violate the Lanham Act when he did so? There’s a wonderful ironic twist to the fact that the act prohibits not only correspondence but also intercourse with foreign powers, vis-a-vis the supposed peccadillos of certain high officials in Moscow hotels with Russian “hostesses.”

You’ve got to admit that the scenes of Republican members of Congress bounding out of the back doors of convention halls, pursued by screaming constituents unhappy that they might lose their much-hated Obamacare insurance, belong on “America’s Funniest Home Videos.” I think they forgot the well-known American rule that as much as any citizen hates any or all benefits conferred on others, they will kill to keep anything they enjoy themselves.

I don’t know about you, but I thought that Dick Blumenthal outing Neil Gorsuch’s remark that judges really don’t like it when politicians take shots at courts was kind of unfair. Really, did anyone doubt that’s how he felt? The “Notorious RBG” could have told you as much. I am willing to give Gorsuch some wiggle room, seeing as he is a double black diamond skier. That’s way cooler than Scalia shooting pigeons or Cheney shooting hunting pals in the face.

And poor Kellyanne Conway (also a lawyer, don’t forget). Is she going to get hauled into disciplinary court for shilling Ivanka Trump’s overpriced, made-in-China shoes and handbags during a CNN interview? Come on! She was just supporting a sister.

I’m sorry if this piece is a bit short, but Sean Spicer’s daily exorcism is coming on soon, and I have to freshen up before it starts. I can’t miss a minute of the rage, the malapropisms, and the circular logic. He’s approaching the point where he’s now channeling Melissa McCarthy the way Sarah Palin channeled Tina Fey. Life imitates art, and you can’t tell them apart.

I heard Jon Stewart posit the other day that all of this craziness is good, and I think he’s right. It’s going to make a lot of people much more aware of their rights, engaged in the process, and willing to engage on a whole range of topics that hitherto were the province of academics and wonks. I gotta go! Sean’s on and he’s mad.