Kerrie Campbell, partner with Chadbourne & Parke, in Washington, D.C. September 1, 2016. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/ALM.
Kerrie Campbell, partner with Chadbourne & Parke, in Washington, D.C. September 1, 2016. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/ALM. (Diego M. Radzinschi)

Kerrie Campbell, who was ousted from Chadbourne & Parke’s partnership amid a lawsuit alleging the firm discriminated against female partners, has opened her own legal outfit, according to Washington, D.C., bar records.

Campbell’s listing in the D.C. bar membership shows that she now practices at KCampbell-Law, and an internet domain name registration shows she has also taken a step toward setting up the website, www.kcampbell-law.com. The mailing address listed in Campbell’s bar records corresponds to a shared office space on K Street in Washington, just northwest of the city’s Farragut Square.

Campbell did not immediately respond on Tuesday to an email sent to the address included in her D.C. bar membership listing.

For Campbell, the apparent move to becoming a solo practitioner marks a shift from her previous role as a Chadbourne litigation partner. That firm voted in April to expel Campbell from the partnership, a development that followed a $100 million proposed class action that the lawyer filed in 2016, accusing Chadbourne of running as an “all-male dictatorship.”

The lawsuit coincided with the run-up to a combination between Chadbourne and global legal giant Norton Rose Fulbright. That merger was finalized at the end of June.

Campbell’s sex bias suit has also been joined by former Chadbourne partner Mary Yelenick, who remains at Norton Rose in an of counsel role, and Chadbourne’s former Kiev, Ukraine, office leader Jaroslawa Zelinsky Johnson. The lawsuit overcame an initial hurdle last month, when a Manhattan federal judge declined to dismiss it.

In addition to keeping the case intact, U.S. District Judge J. Paul Oetken of the Southern District of New York on June 14 ordered limited discovery on the question of whether the former Chadbourne partners could be considered employees who qualified for protection under employment laws.

In early July, a federal magistrate judge in Manhattan ruled that Norton Rose could be added to the Campbell suit as a defendant in light of its combination with Chadbourne.

David Sanford of Sanford Heisler Sharp, a firm leading multiple gender bias lawsuits against Big Law firms, represents the former Chadbourne partners in the suit.