Reed Smith is opening a Miami office with an international arbitration practice picked up from Miami-based boutique firm Astigarraga Davis. The Astigarraga firm will be no more, but more than half of its lawyers will continue to work together at a new successor firm.

Astigarraga Davis co-founder Jose Astigarraga is taking a seven-lawyer international arbitration and litigation group to Reed Smith, and the Miami-based team will open the law firm’s 27th office worldwide. Astigarraga will join Reed Smith as a partner, as will his colleagues Edward Mullins and M. Cristina Cárdenas. The other former Astigarraga Davis lawyers moving to Reed Smith will join as counsel or associates.

Meanwhile, Astigarraga Davis co-founder Edward Davis Jr. will change the firm’s name to Sequor Law, which will focus on such practice areas as asset recovery, financial fraud and cross-border insolvency.

In a statement, Reed Smith said it expects the new Miami office and the group of Astigarraga-led lawyers to elevate the firm’s profile and help it attract additional talent to strengthen its Latin American business practice. Astigarraga Davis, which had been around for roughly 17 years, built a strong reputation for work with ties to Latin America.

“What attracted us to Jose, Ed [Mullins] and their team are really two things—quality and culture,” Reed Smith managing partner Sandy Thomas said in an interview. He added that Astigarraga has built a highly recognized international arbitration practice, and that the addition of the new team will serve to bolster the existing strength of Reed Smith’s practice in that realm.


4/10/17- Miami- Gregory S. Grossman and Edward H. Davis, of Sequor Law.

Astigarraga, who also becomes the leader of Reed Smith’s international arbitration practice, said in an interview that his team has in the past resisted offers to join a bigger firm. But over time, he said, it started to make more sense to join a firm with a larger geographical footprint—one that could offer services to clients that go beyond what Astigarraga had focused on.

“We’re very, very focused on the future, and so we’re trying to look ahead,” said Astigarraga. “We have clients who would like to use us, or whom we could help, outside of Latin America.”

Once he and his team began to look for opportunities that would match their changing client needs, Astigarraga said, it quickly became clear that Reed Smith fit the bill. He explained that he was drawn to the firm’s existing capabilities in Latin America, as well as Reed Smith’s organization around five key industry groups—energy, financial services, life sciences, media and entertainment, and shipping and transportation.

“Once we got to looking at it, the synergy with Reed Smith became very obvious,” Astigarraga said. “This is a firm that has a very clear picture of what it wants to do and how it wants to do it.”

While Astigarraga is leading a team to Reed Smith, Davis will open Sequor Law, which will focus on representing clients internationally in asset recovery, financial fraud and other financial matters. Davis will be joined by eight other lawyers, most of whom previously worked at Astigarraga Davis, including Gregory Grossman, who will head the new firm’s international insolvency and financial litigation practice.

In an interview, Davis and Grossman said their firm specializes in helping clients who were victims of fraud or in bankruptcy proceedings recoup their losses. That focus, Davis added, is even reflected in the new firm’s name: Sequor, he said, derives from the Latin for “to pursue.”

“It tells you what we do, it tells you our mentality,” said Davis.

Davis also said that while it made sense for the international arbitration side of Astigarraga Davis to look for a bigger firm as a new home, he and his team determined that such a move would run the risk of creating a slew of client conflicts. With that in mind, he said the boutique model would continue to allow the firm to do truly independent investigations without so much potential for conflict. The splitting up of Astigarraga Davis, he added, was amicable.

“It’s bittersweet in the sense that we have to part company. But it’s good for our clients and good for our business,” said Davis. “Our hopes are to … continue growing our client base.”

Copyright Daily Business Review. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Reed Smith is opening a Miami office with an international arbitration practice picked up from Miami-based boutique firm Astigarraga Davis. The Astigarraga firm will be no more, but more than half of its lawyers will continue to work together at a new successor firm.

Astigarraga Davis co-founder Jose Astigarraga is taking a seven-lawyer international arbitration and litigation group to Reed Smith , and the Miami-based team will open the law firm’s 27th office worldwide. Astigarraga will join Reed Smith as a partner, as will his colleagues Edward Mullins and M. Cristina Cárdenas. The other former Astigarraga Davis lawyers moving to Reed Smith will join as counsel or associates.

Meanwhile, Astigarraga Davis co-founder Edward Davis Jr. will change the firm’s name to Sequor Law, which will focus on such practice areas as asset recovery, financial fraud and cross-border insolvency.

In a statement, Reed Smith said it expects the new Miami office and the group of Astigarraga-led lawyers to elevate the firm’s profile and help it attract additional talent to strengthen its Latin American business practice. Astigarraga Davis, which had been around for roughly 17 years, built a strong reputation for work with ties to Latin America.

“What attracted us to Jose, Ed [Mullins] and their team are really two things—quality and culture,” Reed Smith managing partner Sandy Thomas said in an interview. He added that Astigarraga has built a highly recognized international arbitration practice, and that the addition of the new team will serve to bolster the existing strength of Reed Smith ‘s practice in that realm.


4/10/17- Miami- Gregory S. Grossman and Edward H. Davis, of Sequor Law.

Astigarraga, who also becomes the leader of Reed Smith ‘s international arbitration practice, said in an interview that his team has in the past resisted offers to join a bigger firm. But over time, he said, it started to make more sense to join a firm with a larger geographical footprint—one that could offer services to clients that go beyond what Astigarraga had focused on.

“We’re very, very focused on the future, and so we’re trying to look ahead,” said Astigarraga. “We have clients who would like to use us, or whom we could help, outside of Latin America.”

Once he and his team began to look for opportunities that would match their changing client needs, Astigarraga said, it quickly became clear that Reed Smith fit the bill. He explained that he was drawn to the firm’s existing capabilities in Latin America, as well as Reed Smith ‘s organization around five key industry groups—energy, financial services, life sciences, media and entertainment, and shipping and transportation.

“Once we got to looking at it, the synergy with Reed Smith became very obvious,” Astigarraga said. “This is a firm that has a very clear picture of what it wants to do and how it wants to do it.”

While Astigarraga is leading a team to Reed Smith , Davis will open Sequor Law, which will focus on representing clients internationally in asset recovery, financial fraud and other financial matters. Davis will be joined by eight other lawyers, most of whom previously worked at Astigarraga Davis, including Gregory Grossman, who will head the new firm’s international insolvency and financial litigation practice.

In an interview, Davis and Grossman said their firm specializes in helping clients who were victims of fraud or in bankruptcy proceedings recoup their losses. That focus, Davis added, is even reflected in the new firm’s name: Sequor, he said, derives from the Latin for “to pursue.”

“It tells you what we do, it tells you our mentality,” said Davis.

Davis also said that while it made sense for the international arbitration side of Astigarraga Davis to look for a bigger firm as a new home, he and his team determined that such a move would run the risk of creating a slew of client conflicts. With that in mind, he said the boutique model would continue to allow the firm to do truly independent investigations without so much potential for conflict. The splitting up of Astigarraga Davis, he added, was amicable.

“It’s bittersweet in the sense that we have to part company. But it’s good for our clients and good for our business,” said Davis. “Our hopes are to … continue growing our client base.”

Copyright Daily Business Review. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.