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Continental Breakfast: your daily update on what’s happening in Europe.

One of the lead lawyers in the historic legal challenge over whether the U.K. prime minister has the power to start Brexit has told The American Lawyer that he is “confident” an earlier ruling demanding the process be subject to a parliamentary vote will be upheld.

The U.K. government appealed a landmark High Court ruling that parliament must be allowed to vote on the triggering of Article 50, which starts a two-year deadline for a European Union member to complete its withdrawal from the political bloc.

A four-day hearing before all 11 Supreme Court judges—the largest panel in the court’s 140-year history—concluded yesterday.

David Greene, senior partner at London law firm Edwin Coe, says that while “it is always very difficult” to predict decisions—particularly given the number of judges involved, who will “each have a view”—the claimants “remain confident” of victory as the High Court ruling was “robust” and the arguments in the Supreme Court were “much the same.”

After the “furor” that followed the initial High Court case—certain pro-Brexit newspapers branded the judiciary “enemies of the people” and one of the lead claimants received racial abuse and death threats—the appeal was run “smoothly and calmly,” Greene adds.

Supreme Court President David Neuberger has said that the judges “appreciate this case should be resolved as quickly as possible, and we will do our best to achieve that.” The decision is expected in early January.

U.K. prime minister Theresa May has repeatedly reiterated her intention to trigger Article 50 by the end of March, meaning the U.K. would have to leave the EU by early 2019.

But if the government’s appeal fails, U.K. politicians, the majority of which wanted the country to remain within the EU, could delay or even block the process.

KWM Europe Prepares For Potential Collapse

With King & Wood Mallesons’ European arm heading towards a pre-pack administration, it has emerged that the firm recently changed its partnership deed to prepare for a possible collapse.

KWM’s European partnership earlier this month approved an amendment that would ensure any tax losses are split fairly between current and former partners if the firm does go under, reports The American Lawyer’s U.K. sister title Legal Week.

The deed did not previously cover what would happen to partners’ tax allocations in the event of the business ceasing to exist.

It follows news that KWM Europe’s key lender, Barclays Bank, has revised its debenture agreement to take extra security over the firm’s assets.

The firm was initially forced to grant the bank a debenture over its assets in July. That debenture covered all of the firm’s securities, goodwill and uncalled share capital, intellectual property and current or future trade debts. Barclays imposed several restrictions on the firm, with documents revealing that KWM was required to gain the bank’s prior written consent before it could “sell, assign, lease, license or sub-license, or grant any interest in, [the firm’s] intellectual property rights.”

The new agreement is even more restrictive and covers additional parts of KWM’s European business. The range of circumstances under which the deed would become enforceable and Barclays would take control of the business were expanded to include any request by the firm to appoint an administrator.

The American Lawyer yesterday revealed that KWM Europe is in the advanced stages of discussions surrounding a pre-pack administration—an insolvency process that would involve negotiating its sale to a law firm or group of firms before an administrator is appointed.

The ultimate buyer remains unclear, but talks have previously been held with Dentons and even with KWM’s own Asian arm. DLA Piper and Greenberg Traurig are also understood to have been interested in certain partners and teams.

A KWM source with knowledge of the situation says that the discussions have been “positive.” A deal is expected to be finalized as early as the second half of next week.

KWM Europe’s future was cast into doubt by the collapse of its planned $18.4 million recapitalization. Its European partners comprehensively rejected a financial rescue deal from the firm’s Asia arm.

Contact Chris Johnson at cjohnson@alm.com. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/chris_t_johnson

Continental Breakfast: your daily update on what’s happening in Europe.

One of the lead lawyers in the historic legal challenge over whether the U.K. prime minister has the power to start Brexit has told The American Lawyer that he is “confident” an earlier ruling demanding the process be subject to a parliamentary vote will be upheld.

The U.K. government appealed a landmark High Court ruling that parliament must be allowed to vote on the triggering of Article 50, which starts a two-year deadline for a European Union member to complete its withdrawal from the political bloc.

A four-day hearing before all 11 Supreme Court judges—the largest panel in the court’s 140-year history—concluded yesterday.

David Greene, senior partner at London law firm Edwin Coe, says that while “it is always very difficult” to predict decisions—particularly given the number of judges involved, who will “each have a view”—the claimants “remain confident” of victory as the High Court ruling was “robust” and the arguments in the Supreme Court were “much the same.”

After the “furor” that followed the initial High Court case—certain pro-Brexit newspapers branded the judiciary “enemies of the people” and one of the lead claimants received racial abuse and death threats—the appeal was run “smoothly and calmly,” Greene adds.

Supreme Court President David Neuberger has said that the judges “appreciate this case should be resolved as quickly as possible, and we will do our best to achieve that.” The decision is expected in early January.

U.K. prime minister Theresa May has repeatedly reiterated her intention to trigger Article 50 by the end of March, meaning the U.K. would have to leave the EU by early 2019.

But if the government’s appeal fails, U.K. politicians, the majority of which wanted the country to remain within the EU, could delay or even block the process.

KWM Europe Prepares For Potential Collapse

With King & Wood Mallesons ’ European arm heading towards a pre-pack administration, it has emerged that the firm recently changed its partnership deed to prepare for a possible collapse.

KWM’s European partnership earlier this month approved an amendment that would ensure any tax losses are split fairly between current and former partners if the firm does go under, reports The American Lawyer’s U.K. sister title Legal Week.

The deed did not previously cover what would happen to partners’ tax allocations in the event of the business ceasing to exist.

It follows news that KWM Europe’s key lender, Barclays Bank, has revised its debenture agreement to take extra security over the firm’s assets.

The firm was initially forced to grant the bank a debenture over its assets in July. That debenture covered all of the firm’s securities, goodwill and uncalled share capital, intellectual property and current or future trade debts. Barclays imposed several restrictions on the firm, with documents revealing that KWM was required to gain the bank’s prior written consent before it could “sell, assign, lease, license or sub-license, or grant any interest in, [the firm’s] intellectual property rights.”

The new agreement is even more restrictive and covers additional parts of KWM’s European business. The range of circumstances under which the deed would become enforceable and Barclays would take control of the business were expanded to include any request by the firm to appoint an administrator.

The American Lawyer yesterday revealed that KWM Europe is in the advanced stages of discussions surrounding a pre-pack administration—an insolvency process that would involve negotiating its sale to a law firm or group of firms before an administrator is appointed.

The ultimate buyer remains unclear, but talks have previously been held with Dentons and even with KWM’s own Asian arm. DLA Piper and Greenberg Traurig are also understood to have been interested in certain partners and teams.

A KWM source with knowledge of the situation says that the discussions have been “positive.” A deal is expected to be finalized as early as the second half of next week.

KWM Europe’s future was cast into doubt by the collapse of its planned $18.4 million recapitalization. Its European partners comprehensively rejected a financial rescue deal from the firm’s Asia arm.

Contact Chris Johnson at cjohnson@alm.com. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/chris_t_johnson