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Continental Breakfast: your daily update on what’s happening in Europe.

An Oxford graduate is suing the prestigious university for 1 million pounds ($1.27 million), claiming that its “appallingly bad” teaching prevented him from having a successful career as a lawyer.

Faiz Siddiqui, who graduated with a degree in modern history 16 years ago, told the high court he believes he would have had a career as an international commercial lawyer if he had been awarded a first-class degree, rather than the upper second-class he actually achieved. (Instead of using a GPA system, U.K. degrees are graded in four categories: first class, upper second class, lower second class and third class.)

Siddiqui, who trained as a solicitor after leaving university, claims that he underachieved due to “negligent” teaching.

The university attempted to have the case struck off, arguing that it was brought outside the legal time limit and has no merit. But a high court judge yesterday allowed the action to proceed, saying that he was “satisfied the university has a case to answer.”

A judgment is expected by the end of the year and could lead to copycat claims from other students.

Siddiqui is being represented by London employment law boutique Dale Langley & Co. and Roger Mallalieu, a barrister at 4 New Square. The University of Oxford is being advised by Bristol-based law firm Bevan Brittan.

Quinn Emanuel, Mishcon Win $1 Billion Payout For RBS Shareholders

Three groups of Royal Bank of Scotland shareholders are celebrating an 800 million pounds ($1 billion) payday after the institution agreed to settle allegations that it misled investors over its financial health ahead of a 12 billion pounds ($15.3 billion) fundraising in 2008.

RBS reached a settlement with the shareholders, represented by Mishcon de Reya, Stewarts Law and Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, and said it would be willing to repay 41 pence ($0.52) for every pound ($1.27) they invested.

But two other shareholder groups, represented by Leon Kaye and Signature Litigation, have rejected the settlement and will now take the case to trial in March 2017.

The RBS Shareholder Action Group, which comprises 27,000 retail investors, is seeking 1.2 billion pounds ($1.5 billion) and is also suing the bank’s former management, including disgraced former CEO Fred Goodwin.

RBS, which is 73 percent owned by British taxpayers after being bailed out by the government in 2008, is being represented by Herbert Smith Freehills and a number of senior barristers at Fountain Court, One Essex Court and Serle Court.

It is yet another blow for RBS, which last week failed the Bank of England’s annual stress test of the U.K. banking system and also faces a massive impending fine from the U.S. Department of Justice over the mis-selling of toxic residential mortgage-backed securities in the run up to the financial crisis.

The fine recently forced the U.K. government to halt its attempts to offload more of its majority holding the bank.

RBS has a large panel of external legal advisors, including Allen & Overy, Ashurst, Clifford Chance, Linklaters and Simmons & Simmons.

Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer advised the Bank of England on its bailing out of RBS in 2008, and also acted for the government on its sale of a 5 percent stake in the bank in 2015.

Contact Chris Johnson at cjohnson@alm.com. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/chris_t_johnson

Continental Breakfast: your daily update on what’s happening in Europe.

An Oxford graduate is suing the prestigious university for 1 million pounds ($1.27 million), claiming that its “appallingly bad” teaching prevented him from having a successful career as a lawyer.

Faiz Siddiqui, who graduated with a degree in modern history 16 years ago, told the high court he believes he would have had a career as an international commercial lawyer if he had been awarded a first-class degree, rather than the upper second-class he actually achieved. (Instead of using a GPA system, U.K. degrees are graded in four categories: first class, upper second class, lower second class and third class.)

Siddiqui, who trained as a solicitor after leaving university, claims that he underachieved due to “negligent” teaching.

The university attempted to have the case struck off, arguing that it was brought outside the legal time limit and has no merit. But a high court judge yesterday allowed the action to proceed, saying that he was “satisfied the university has a case to answer.”

A judgment is expected by the end of the year and could lead to copycat claims from other students.

Siddiqui is being represented by London employment law boutique Dale Langley & Co. and Roger Mallalieu, a barrister at 4 New Square. The University of Oxford is being advised by Bristol-based law firm Bevan Brittan.

Quinn Emanuel , Mishcon Win $1 Billion Payout For RBS Shareholders

Three groups of Royal Bank of Scotland shareholders are celebrating an 800 million pounds ($1 billion) payday after the institution agreed to settle allegations that it misled investors over its financial health ahead of a 12 billion pounds ($15.3 billion) fundraising in 2008.

RBS reached a settlement with the shareholders, represented by Mishcon de Reya, Stewarts Law and Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan , and said it would be willing to repay 41 pence ($0.52) for every pound ($1.27) they invested.

But two other shareholder groups, represented by Leon Kaye and Signature Litigation, have rejected the settlement and will now take the case to trial in March 2017.

The RBS Shareholder Action Group, which comprises 27,000 retail investors, is seeking 1.2 billion pounds ($1.5 billion) and is also suing the bank’s former management, including disgraced former CEO Fred Goodwin.

RBS, which is 73 percent owned by British taxpayers after being bailed out by the government in 2008, is being represented by Herbert Smith Freehills and a number of senior barristers at Fountain Court, One Essex Court and Serle Court.

It is yet another blow for RBS, which last week failed the Bank of England’s annual stress test of the U.K. banking system and also faces a massive impending fine from the U.S. Department of Justice over the mis-selling of toxic residential mortgage-backed securities in the run up to the financial crisis.

The fine recently forced the U.K. government to halt its attempts to offload more of its majority holding the bank.

RBS has a large panel of external legal advisors, including Allen & Overy , Ashurst , Clifford Chance , Linklaters and Simmons & Simmons .

Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer advised the Bank of England on its bailing out of RBS in 2008, and also acted for the government on its sale of a 5 percent stake in the bank in 2015.

Contact Chris Johnson at cjohnson@alm.com. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/chris_t_johnson