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Slater and Gordon, the world’s first publicly listed law firm, said the Australian government has concluded its investigation into whether the firm falsified or manipulated its records, clearing it of wrongdoing.

The Australian Securities Exchange-listed firm said in a three-paragraph announcement on March 24 that the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) has finished investigating the firm’s accounts between Dec. 1, 2014, and Sept. 29, 2015, and found no evidence that indicated a breach of law.

The federal corporate watchdog announced an investigation into Slater and Gordon in December of last year, after the firm posted an A$1 billion, or $760 million, loss for financial year 2015-2016. The purpose of the probe was to find out whether the firm deliberately falsified or manipulated its records or accounts during the 10-month period.

Much of Slater and Gordon’s trouble centered on its March 2015 acquisition of British insurance claims processor Quindell Plc.’s professional services arm. Soon after that $947 million deal, the U.K.’s Financial Conduct Authority announced it would investigate Quindell’s accounting practices during 2013 and 2014; that was followed by another probe by the Serious Fraud Office in August 2015.

The ill-fated deal eventually prompted Slater and Gordon to sue Quindell , now known as Watchstone Group, in the U.K. in September 2016. Meanwhile, Slater and Gordon itself became subject to at least two shareholder class action suits in Australia.

According to Australian publication Lawyers Weekly, Slater and Gordon’s share price rose by 30 percent to A$0.145 following the announcement of the ASIC’s decision. Slater and Gordon was the world’s first law firm to go public in 2007 after issuing 35 million shares at A$1.00 apiece.

In February, Slater and Gordon again reported losses of A$425 million, or $324 million, for the six months ending Dec. 31, 2016.

Slater and Gordon, the world’s first publicly listed law firm, said the Australian government has concluded its investigation into whether the firm falsified or manipulated its records, clearing it of wrongdoing.

The Australian Securities Exchange-listed firm said in a three-paragraph announcement on March 24 that the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) has finished investigating the firm’s accounts between Dec. 1, 2014, and Sept. 29, 2015, and found no evidence that indicated a breach of law.

The federal corporate watchdog announced an investigation into Slater and Gordon in December of last year, after the firm posted an A$1 billion, or $760 million, loss for financial year 2015-2016. The purpose of the probe was to find out whether the firm deliberately falsified or manipulated its records or accounts during the 10-month period.

Much of Slater and Gordon’s trouble centered on its March 2015 acquisition of British insurance claims processor Quindell Plc.’s professional services arm. Soon after that $947 million deal, the U.K.’s Financial Conduct Authority announced it would investigate Quindell’s accounting practices during 2013 and 2014; that was followed by another probe by the Serious Fraud Office in August 2015.

The ill-fated deal eventually prompted Slater and Gordon to sue Quindell , now known as Watchstone Group, in the U.K. in September 2016. Meanwhile, Slater and Gordon itself became subject to at least two shareholder class action suits in Australia.

According to Australian publication Lawyers Weekly, Slater and Gordon’s share price rose by 30 percent to A$0.145 following the announcement of the ASIC’s decision. Slater and Gordon was the world’s first law firm to go public in 2007 after issuing 35 million shares at A$1.00 apiece.

In February, Slater and Gordon again reported losses of A$425 million, or $324 million, for the six months ending Dec. 31, 2016.