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Almost three years after Duane Morris developed a proprietary system for analyzing the anatomy of its cases for pricing purposes, the firm has trademarked its logo for the tool, DNA.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office gave approval for trademarking the logo for the firm’s Dispute Navigation Analytics software, which allows attorneys to price out client matters based on staffing estimates, case complexity and how much similar cases cost in the past.

“The DNA trademark distinguishes our work,” said Duane Morris chairman John Soroko in a statement, and “will help us propagate our efforts to make this tool available, visible and useful to our clients as we move forward with using and refining the DNA product.”

Matthew Taylor, vice chairman of Duane Morris and head of the trial practice group, was involved in creating the tool with partners Michael Zullo and Wayne Mack in 2013. In the nearly three years since, Taylor said, a number of clients have utilized the system as part of early case assessments Duane Morris offers its clients.

DNA examines factors such as who is the opposing counsel, jury behavior and demographic information, the potential number of witnesses, cost of e-discovery, and the judge presiding over the matter. Indirect factors, such as loss of institutional prestige, and the impact on shareholders and their relationship with banks and other financial institutions also form part of the equation, the firm had said when announcing DNA.

The software has been continually updated over the years to include new case data. Taylor said forcing lawyers to think about staffing from the outset forces them to be better project managers. The estimates spit out by DNA are based on the billable hour. Taylor said not all clients are looking to use the tool, but he said many have and have given positive feedback. He said it sometimes leads to discussions on alternative fee arrangements.

Taylor said he and his team certainly weren’t going into the creation of DNA thinking about trademarking it one day. And he said he wouldn’t change his approach to pitching it to the appropriate client simply because of the trademark. But Taylor said the response to the program has been so positive and the concept seemingly so proprietary and unique that the firm wanted to protect the logo.

Gina Passarella can be contacted at 215-557-2494 or gpassarella@alm.com. Follow her on Twitter @GPassarellaTLI.

Almost three years after Duane Morris developed a proprietary system for analyzing the anatomy of its cases for pricing purposes, the firm has trademarked its logo for the tool, DNA.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office gave approval for trademarking the logo for the firm’s Dispute Navigation Analytics software, which allows attorneys to price out client matters based on staffing estimates, case complexity and how much similar cases cost in the past.

“The DNA trademark distinguishes our work,” said Duane Morris chairman John Soroko in a statement, and “will help us propagate our efforts to make this tool available, visible and useful to our clients as we move forward with using and refining the DNA product.”

Matthew Taylor, vice chairman of Duane Morris and head of the trial practice group, was involved in creating the tool with partners Michael Zullo and Wayne Mack in 2013. In the nearly three years since, Taylor said, a number of clients have utilized the system as part of early case assessments Duane Morris offers its clients.

DNA examines factors such as who is the opposing counsel, jury behavior and demographic information, the potential number of witnesses, cost of e-discovery, and the judge presiding over the matter. Indirect factors, such as loss of institutional prestige, and the impact on shareholders and their relationship with banks and other financial institutions also form part of the equation, the firm had said when announcing DNA.

The software has been continually updated over the years to include new case data. Taylor said forcing lawyers to think about staffing from the outset forces them to be better project managers. The estimates spit out by DNA are based on the billable hour. Taylor said not all clients are looking to use the tool, but he said many have and have given positive feedback. He said it sometimes leads to discussions on alternative fee arrangements.

Taylor said he and his team certainly weren’t going into the creation of DNA thinking about trademarking it one day. And he said he wouldn’t change his approach to pitching it to the appropriate client simply because of the trademark. But Taylor said the response to the program has been so positive and the concept seemingly so proprietary and unique that the firm wanted to protect the logo.

Gina Passarella can be contacted at 215-557-2494 or gpassarella@alm.com. Follow her on Twitter @GPassarellaTLI.