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As legal technologies becomes more complex, many law firms and legal departments have come to expect legal and IT support as part of the package. For some technology providers, this means expanding their own in-house capabilities to include consultancy and support offerings. For other, it means entering partnerships with outside companies.

It’s rare, however, for two companies to connect for a partnership at the magnitude of what HBR Consulting and LexisNexis announced last week. On April 3, the companies announced Managed Technology Services LLC (MTS), a venture that will be jointly operated by HBR and LexisNexis. The new offering will utilize LexisNexis technologies and data hosting capabilities, while HBR provides a strategy element to help with implementation.

The goal is to “address IT and litigation support needs more comprehensively than would be possible through either company’s individual efforts,” HBR Consulting said in a press release. MTS employees will primarily be based out of pre-existing HBR and LexisNexis locations in the Dayton, Ohio, and Raleigh, North Carolina, areas.

The key to the joint venture, said Chris Petrini-Poli, CEO of HBR Consulting, is gained efficiencies. While HBR could have built out its own technology arm, or LexisNexis could have further built out services, it made more sense for the companies to combine forces to utilize each side’s own areas of strength.

“This joint venture allows us to provide law firms with a more holistic, full-service approach to IT managed services than either of us were capable of offering on our own,” he said.

Petrini-Poli told Legaltech News following the announcement that the idea for MTS arose from a need “to address the rapid changes and demands our clients are facing.” He added that it certainly didn’t hurt that HBR and LexisNexis’s user bases heavily overlap, allowing efficiencies to be easily gained through integration.

“As we looked to build upon our IT managed services offerings, we saw LexisNexis’ capabilities in running data centers, infrastructure, hosted litigation and high-end security as complementary to our IT advisory and managed services capabilities,” he explained. “Both of our companies also have a strong focus on the legal market and decades of industry experience, meaning we can offer clients knowledgeable advice and solutions tailored to legal.”

MTS will focus not only on pre-existing HBR and LexisNexis clients, though, but in building a book of business all its own. Petrini-Poli noted that HBR has seen that “as IT environments become more complicated and risks increase, we are seeing other law firms leverage the capabilities and expertise of IT managed services providers.”

And that type of expertise could be crucial in the legal technology industry of the future, similar to how managed services has grown in other tech-dependent industries like software or financial services.

“This certainly is a model that has been used in other industries. We have observed the benefits, with the joint venture being the outcome,” Petrini-Poli added. “Clients are asking, and we responding. We see the newly formed Managed Technology Services solution as a continuation of our approach to respond to client needs.”

As legal technologies becomes more complex, many law firms and legal departments have come to expect legal and IT support as part of the package. For some technology providers, this means expanding their own in-house capabilities to include consultancy and support offerings. For other, it means entering partnerships with outside companies.

It’s rare, however, for two companies to connect for a partnership at the magnitude of what HBR Consulting and LexisNexis announced last week. On April 3, the companies announced Managed Technology Services LLC (MTS), a venture that will be jointly operated by HBR and LexisNexis . The new offering will utilize LexisNexis technologies and data hosting capabilities, while HBR provides a strategy element to help with implementation.

The goal is to “address IT and litigation support needs more comprehensively than would be possible through either company’s individual efforts,” HBR Consulting said in a press release. MTS employees will primarily be based out of pre-existing HBR and LexisNexis locations in the Dayton, Ohio, and Raleigh, North Carolina, areas.

The key to the joint venture, said Chris Petrini-Poli, CEO of HBR Consulting, is gained efficiencies. While HBR could have built out its own technology arm, or LexisNexis could have further built out services, it made more sense for the companies to combine forces to utilize each side’s own areas of strength.

“This joint venture allows us to provide law firms with a more holistic, full-service approach to IT managed services than either of us were capable of offering on our own,” he said.

Petrini-Poli told Legaltech News following the announcement that the idea for MTS arose from a need “to address the rapid changes and demands our clients are facing.” He added that it certainly didn’t hurt that HBR and LexisNexis ‘s user bases heavily overlap, allowing efficiencies to be easily gained through integration.

“As we looked to build upon our IT managed services offerings, we saw LexisNexis ‘ capabilities in running data centers, infrastructure, hosted litigation and high-end security as complementary to our IT advisory and managed services capabilities,” he explained. “Both of our companies also have a strong focus on the legal market and decades of industry experience, meaning we can offer clients knowledgeable advice and solutions tailored to legal.”

MTS will focus not only on pre-existing HBR and LexisNexis clients, though, but in building a book of business all its own. Petrini-Poli noted that HBR has seen that “as IT environments become more complicated and risks increase, we are seeing other law firms leverage the capabilities and expertise of IT managed services providers.”

And that type of expertise could be crucial in the legal technology industry of the future, similar to how managed services has grown in other tech-dependent industries like software or financial services.

“This certainly is a model that has been used in other industries. We have observed the benefits, with the joint venture being the outcome,” Petrini-Poli added. “Clients are asking, and we responding. We see the newly formed Managed Technology Services solution as a continuation of our approach to respond to client needs.”