The Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday recommended tenure for three Superior Court judges: two at the trial level and one in the Appellate Division.

Judges Darrell Fineman, Michele Fox and Jerome St. John received unanimous support. Votes by the full Senate have not yet been scheduled.

St. John, 66, before his promotion to the Appellate Division in August 2011, served in the Criminal and Civil Parts in Essex County.

St. John was last reviewed by lawyers in the Law Journal's 2009 Superior Court Judicial Survey. He ranked second out of the 48 judges surveyed in the Essex Vicinage, with an overall competency score of 9.21 out of a possible 10. His highest score, 9.80, was for being courteous and respectful toward lawyers and litigants. His lowest score, 8.90, was for moving proceedings and making decisions promptly. His initial seven-year term ends Oct. 17.

Before his appointment to the bench, he was with Newark's St. John & Wayne. He is a graduate of Seton Hall University School of Law.

Fineman, 66, has been assigned to the Criminal Part in Cumberland County since April 2011. Before that assignment, he served in the Family Part in Cumberland and Salem counties. Prior to his nomination, he was with Vineland's Capizola Fineman & Lapham. He is a graduate of John Marshall Law School in Chicago.

In the Law Journal's 2012 Superior Court Judicial Survey, Fineman ranked 8th out of the 20 judges surveyed in the Cumberland-Gloucester-Salem vicinage, with an overall score of 8.61. His best score, 9.48, was for being unbiased with regard to race, gender or party identity. His poorest score, 8.02, was for moving proceedings and making decisions promptly.

Fineman's initial seven-year term ends on Oct. 17.

Fox, 63, has been assigned to the Criminal Part in Camden County since March 2008. She previously sat in the Civil and Family Parts in Camden. Before her nomination to the bench, she was with the Voorhees office of Ballard Spahr. She is a graduate of Rutgers University Law School-Camden.

In the 2012 Law Journal survey, she ranked 14th out of the 24 judges surveyed in the Camden vicinage, with an overall score of 8.40. Fox's top score, 9.08, was for being unbiased with regard to race, gender or party identity. Her lowest score, 7.88, was for being able to skillfully foster settlement when appropriate.

Her initial term ends on Nov. 17.