judge robe books gavel Credit: shutterstock

The New Jersey Senate late Thursday approved tenure for 13 sitting Superior Court judges from various vicinages, including five currently sitting in Passaic County.

The Senate Judiciary Committee had  recommended tenure for the judges earlier in the week. The nominees passed through without opposition. The judges now can serve until they reach the mandatory retirement age of 70. They are:

  • Patrick Arre, now assigned to the Criminal Part in Hudson County. In the Law Journal’s 2015 survey of Superior Court judges, Arre ranked 17th out of the 30 judges surveyed in the vicinage, with an overall score of 7.83 out of a possible 10. His highest score, 8.55, was for being unbiased as to race, gender or party identity. His lowest score, 7.44, was for being able to handle complex cases.
  • Thomas Brown, currently assigned to the Criminal Part in Mercer County. In the survey, he ranked 15th out of the 16 judges scored in that vicinage, with a score of 6.50. His top score, 8.37, was for being unbiased. His low score, 5.63, was for his knowledge of substantive law.
  • Regina Caulfield, now assigned to the Criminal Part in Union County, ranked eighth of the 20 judges scored in that vicinage, with a score of 8.55. Her best sore was 9.10, for being unbiased; her worst score, 7.97, for being able to skillfully foster settlement when appropriate.
  • Randal Chiocca, now assigned to the Civil Part in Passaic. He ranked fifth out of the 19 judges scored there, with an overall score of 8.89. His highest score, 9.30, was for being unbiased, and his lowest score, 8.37, was for being able to move proceedings and make decisions quickly.
  • Mark Ciarrocca, now assigned to the Civil Part in Union County. He came in fifth out of 20 with an overall score of 8.77. His highest score, 9.22, was for being unbiased, while his lowest score, 8.52, was for being able to handle complex cases.
  • Kathleen Delaney, now assigned to the Criminal Part in Camden County. Out of the 21 judges scored in the vicinage, she finished ninth, with an overall score of 8.70. Her best score, 9.05, was for being unbiased, while her lowest score, 8.22, was for being able skillfully foster settlement when appropriate.
  • Madelin Einbinder, who is the presiding judge of the Family Part in Ocean County. She ranked 11th out of the 17 judges scored in the vicinage with an overall score of 8.38. Her top score, 9.17, was for being courteous and respectful to litigants and lawyers. Her lowest score, 8.00, was for being able to handle complex cases.
  • Donna Gallucio, now assigned to the Criminal Part in Passaic. She ranked 15th out of the vicinage’s 19 scored judges with an overall score of 8.15. Her top score, 8.71, was for being unbiased, while her lowest, 7.86, was for moving cases and making decisions promptly.
  • Lawrence Maron, now assigned to the Family Part in Passaic. He came in 12th out of 19, with an overall score of 8.53. His best score, 9.24, was for being courteous and respectful, while his low score, 7.83, was for being able to handle complex litigation.
  • Sohail Mohammed, now assigned to the Criminal Part in Passaic. He finished 13th out of the 19 judges surveyed with an overall score of 8.46. His top score, 9.24, was for being unbiased; while his low score, 7.98, was for his ability to handle complex cases.
  • Lisa Rose, currently assigned to the Civil Part in Hudson County. She ranked 12th out of the 30 judges scored there, with an overall score of 8.35. Her best score, 9.17, was for being unbiased. Her lowest score, 7.84, was for being able to handle complex cases.
  • Janet Smith, now assigned to the Civil Part in Burlington County. She ranked last out of the 15 judges scored in that vicinage, with an overall rating of 7.10. His best score, 8.38, was for being unbiased; while her lowest score, 6.17, was for her ability to handle complex cases.
  • Daniel Yablonsky, currently assigned to the Family Part in Passaic. He ranked 16th out of 19, with a score of 7.70. His best score, 8.85, was for being unbiased. His lowest score, 7.05, was for his ability to move proceedings and make decisions promptly.