• The Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center has announced the launch of a new Longevity and Aging Law Institute to study and provide resources on legal issues concerning the more than 100 million Americans age 50 and up. It will offer CLEs to lawyers and continuing education credits for licensed professionals such as social workers on topics including estate planning and administration, grandparents' rights, mental health issues, retirement, emergency preparedness and bankruptcy. Its research agenda will focus on law and public policy in longevity and aging law. Professor Marianne Artusio will lead the institute; Robert Abrams, cofounder and of counsel to Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara & Einiger, will chair its advisory board.

• Starting in fall 2014, Pace Law School students will be able to spend a full year in Madrid, thanks to a new exchange program with Universidad Pontificia Comillas in Spain. Students pursuing careers in international law can spend their entire 2L or 3L year abroad earning both an LL.M. in international and European business law from Comillas and a J.D. from Pace. Classes will be taught in English. The same number of Spanish students will attend Pace for the year, earning an LL.M. in comparative legal studies or environmental law. While abroad, the Pace Law students will be able to intern with the international law offices of firms and corporations including Clifford Chance; Latham & Watkins; Hogan Lovells; Baker & McKenzie; Hewlett Packard; and IBM.

• The National Science Foundation has granted $3.75 million to three law schools, including Fordham University School of Law, to support joint research on online privacy for the next 3 1/2 years. Fordham's award totals about $416,000 for its Center on Law and Information Policy; the rest of the grant goes to Carnegie Mellon University and Stanford University. Experts from the three schools will study the challenges facing Internet users trying to make sense of online privacy notices. It will also develop tools that analyze current privacy policies and translate them into more readable language. "Online privacy notices are notorious for their unwieldy length and their befuddling complexity," Fordham Law professor Joel Reidenberg said in a press release. "Through this project, we aim to help users really understand what they are doing when they click that 'I Agree' button."