The Affordable Care Act enshrines a hope — that doctors, hospitals and other providers will team up to improve patient care and reduce costs. But there’s also a fear — that doctors, hospitals and other providers will team up to stifle competition and raise prices instead. Our special report examines the antitrust angle to health reform and other issues, from the legal risks of using social media for health information purposes to the Supreme Court’s first major vaccine-related ruling in more than 15 years.

Health reform has an antitrust angle
Regulations are intended to ensure that care groupings don’t stifle competition.

Pressure increases to disclose problems with drugs, devices
Prosecution, shareholder suits, punitive damages await companies that hide ‘adverse events.’

Social media: P.R. boon or risk-management nightmare?
Providers that want to use these networks face a thicket of legal considerations.

Employers turn to on-site clinics, but there are legal considerations
An attorney experienced in the laws implicated by the on-site clinic can ensure that a company will get the most out of this innovative concept in employee health care.

Individual and small group rates subject to oversight
Health insurers and employers must understand what the Rate Increase Disclosure and Review Rule does and does not do, and its interplay with state law, to ensure compliance and minimize its administrative burden.

Drug companies inoculated against vaccine claims
In the U.S. Supreme Court’s first major vaccine-related ruling in more than 15 years, the justices held that design defect claims against vaccine manufacturers are pre-empted under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act.