While internet of things (IoT) devices can hold volumes of discoverable data that may make or break a case, many attorneys often ignore such technology because of the difficulty in accessing and understanding the data. But as IoT devices become more popular, experts say it’s not a subject attorneys can bury their heads in the sand over.

Smartphones may be the first item that comes to mind when you hear the term internet of things. However, items such as Fitbits, Amazon’s Alexa, self-vacuuming Roombas and internet-connected cars also fall under the IoT umbrella. After all, IoT pertains to any physical item connected to the internet that collects and shares data.

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