While cryptocurrency trading has long evaded the purview of regulators and courts alike, its days as the Wild West of finance may be coming to an end. Still, in such a fast-evolving industry, scams can be rampant, and it’s not always clear how to fight back against potentially anonymous traders using exchange platforms registered all around the world.

Cryptocurrency fraud litigation can result, but certain variables have to align just right. Just ask David McGill and Benjamin Sauter, litigators at Kobre & Kim who in February 2018 filed a complaint in the Superior Court of Delaware on behalf of their client Elizabeth White. White, who according to the complaint is the CEO of a Delaware-registered company which sells fine art, luxury goods and “is also actively involved in cryptocurrency mining, trading, and investing,” was the victim of cryptocurrency fraud.

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