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The model predicts that if a sober 25-year-old man, driving 80 mph (in a 70 mph zone) in a 2012 Ford Focus on a dry Dallas road at 2 pm is in an accident involving two cars, the chances that he dies are 2%. However, if alcohol is involved, but all other variables remain static, the chances of death increase to 10%. (Credit: Photographee.eu) The model predicts that if a sober 25-year-old man, driving 80 mph (in a 70 mph zone) in a 2012 Ford Focus on a dry Dallas road at 2 pm is in an accident involving two cars, the chances that he dies are 2%. However, if alcohol is involved, but all other variables remain static, the chances of death increase to 10%. (Credit: Photographee.eu)

Researchers at Southern Methodist University (SMU) have developed a predictability model that factors in certain variables, such as drunk driving and speeding, to determine how severe an accident would be.

As part of the program, the university established an interactive online system to enable the insurance industry to leverage the tool. SMU reported the model can also help uncover accident hotspots and the reason behind them.

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