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A new analysis has found that, among patients with cancer, rates of health insurance coverage vary by patient demographics and by cancer type. Published online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that the expansion of coverage through the Affordable Care Act may disproportionally benefit certain patient populations.

In the United States, an estimated 48 million individuals live without health insurance. To examine how insurance coverage differed among cancer patients according to various individual factors such as age, gender, and race, as well as according to different cancer types, Usama Mahmood, M.D., an investigator at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and Stephen Grant, a medical student at Baylor College of Medicine, led a team that analyzed information from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (“SEER”) database, which compiles incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries in the United States. Their analysis included 688,794 patients age 18 to 64 years who were diagnosed with one of the top 25 cancers between 2007 and 2010.

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