In June, President Donald Trump unveiled his plans to scale back the U.S. policy toward Cuba, announcing that he was “cancelling the last administration’s completely one-sided deal” with the country. The move has implications for trademark owners, although in many respects overall strategies shouldn’t change—particularly in those situations where brand-owning companies are faced with third parties trying to hijack their valuable trademarks and other intellectual property in Cuba.

The National Security Presidential Memorandum on Strengthening the Policy of the United States Toward Cuba requires the secretary of state to “identify the entities or sub-entities that are under the control of, or act for or on behalf of, the Cuban military, intelligence, or security services or personnel,” with direct financial transactions with such entities to be prohibited (with some exceptions).

This content has been archived. It is available through our partners, LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law.

To view this content, please continue to their sites.

Not a Lexis Advance® Subscriber?
Subscribe Now

Not a Bloomberg Law Subscriber?
Subscribe Now

Why am I seeing this?

LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law are third party online distributors of the broad collection of current and archived versions of ALM's legal news publications. LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law customers are able to access and use ALM's content, including content from the National Law Journal, The American Lawyer, Legaltech News, The New York Law Journal, and Corporate Counsel, as well as other sources of legal information.

For questions call 1-877-256-2472 or contact us at [email protected]