Community associations are microcosms of democratic society. They are relatively self-sufficient communities, each with their own rules and citizens, and they are governed by an elected board of directors that serves to manage and operate the community as well as enforce and abide by the provisions of its declaration and all of the applicable state and federal laws.

When disputes arise that are strictly between community association members, associations typically allow the members who are involved to come to terms between themselves. Associations cannot become involved in every member-to-member issue as that would create a significant drain on their administrative time and finances.

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