The field of paralegal enterprise is getting a lot of attention today. A recent report by a Connecticut Bar Association committee on the “problem” of law schools included a suggestion that some of what folks call the justice gap — the lack of access on the part of many to resources necessary to meet their basic legal needs, could be met by empowering paralegals to offer direct-to-the public service.

And there is a move on the part of court administrators in some states to solve some of their self-represented party problems by pairing them with concierges who will lead them through the legal thicket and, in some instances, stand with them in the well of the court to act as a translator/communicator between the judge and the judged.

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