Attention:
Card image cap

California (CA) Criminal Law CLE Course Catalog

Explore our entire library of CLE courses. Search the whole catalog or filter courses by state, practice area, provider, credit type, and format

Sort by

All CLE Courses For California (CA) Criminal Law

Card image cap
61 minutes
cc
From Judge to Defendant: Crimes and Notorious Abuses of Power by Judges
In most cases, judges represent the best and brightest of the legal profession. Yet, there are a few who experienced spectacular falls from grace. In this entertaining program, Andrew Struve chronicles the rise and fall of several infamous judges – ranging from Sol Watchler to Walter Nixon to Harry Claiborne – and discusses how their conduct ran afoul of the law and the ethics rules. The program materials include an ethical violation scorecard so can play along as we catalog the ethics violations committed by this rogues gallery of former judges.

New Media Legal

$75

Add to Cart
Card image cap
61 minutes
cc
Fraud: Exploring Best Practices, Techniques and Latest Technologies
Businesses everywhere are dealing with the repercussions of inflation, and of those is the increase in fraud risks to an organization. The risk of fraud is inevitable for companies of all shapes and sizes, but the pressures of current inflationary times mean the need for preventive oversight is at an all-time high. Fraud expert Natalie Lewis will provide insight into the internal and external threats of fraud as well as best practices to protect your organization.

Property Casualty 360

$65

Add to Cart
Card image cap
68 minutes
cc
The Curious Lawyer: Sex, Videotapes, and Lies
In the next installment of this popular series, Peter Afrasiabi takes a fun look at what the Constitution – as well as the criminal and tort law – have to say about sex, including those who choose to record it or lie about it. This program includes an overview of laws regulating sexual behavior (e.g., adultery, incest, obscenity), voyeurism (e.g., pornography, revenge porn, peeping Tom laws) and lying about sex (e.g., right to lie, perjury).

New Media Legal

$75

Add to Cart
Card image cap
61 minutes
cc
Investigations Double Play: Five Lessons from White-Collar Investigations and Conducting Defensible Internal Investigations
There are few things senior executives fear more than criminal prosecution, and that's with good reason because being prosecuted can ruin lives, reputations, finances -- both corporate and personal -- marriages, and families. This program provides practical advice for counsel on how their companies can seek to avoid triggering a criminal investigation and what to do if you're faced with one. With whistleblower complaints skyrocketing, how can companies conduct internal investigations that will be defensible to the SEC and other regulators? This program shares five key lessons for in-house lawyers as they are considering launching, managing and reporting the results of internal investigations.

New Media Legal

$75

Add to Cart
Card image cap
-1
60 minutes
cc
Potpourri Double Play: The Drying of the World and the Cannabis Industry Gold Rush
What would your company do if it ran out of water? For many reasons -- including climate change and population growth -- this is not merely a hypothetical but a real risk that your company needs to assess and manage. This program provides the guidance you need to evaluate and address the water risks your company faces while suggesting ways your company may be able to transform water risks into business opportunities. In the United States, cannabis is growing faster than any other industry and is expected to generate over $20 billion by 2020. But investing in cannabis, or doing business with companies involved in cannabis production or distribution, comes with substantial legal and other risks. This program offers practical advice to avoid the most common pitfalls when companies choose to invest in cannabis or do business with companies in that industry.

New Media Legal

$75

Add to Cart
Card image cap
-1
132 minutes
cc
Saltzman Seminars: U.S. Supreme Court Decisions on Criminal Law Issues: October Term 2021
Join Professor Saltzman as he explains and provides insight into each of the 19 Supreme Court cases decided during the 2021-2022 term that involved criminal law issues.

Saltzman Seminars

$165

Add to Cart
Card image cap
63 minutes
cc
Intersection of the Bankruptcy Code with Criminal and Civil Forfeiture
Amid criminal seizure and forfeiture actions imposed by the DOJ, SEC and other regulatory bodies, criminals often have no choice but to file for bankruptcy. This panel will explore financial crimes, including Ponzi and FCPA schemes, that have resulted in bankruptcy filings, and the conflict that ultimately arises between the bankruptcy estate and the federal government over criminals’ seized and forfeited assets. The panelists will also delve into asserting a legal interest in the assets, the look-back period, remedies to the bankruptcy estate and priority schemes.

American Bankruptcy Institute

$75

Add to Cart
Card image cap
61 minutes
cc
Health Care Fraud: Pandemic Impacts and Financial Implications for the Industry
COVID-19 spurred unprecedented levels of government support. Through Provider Relief Funds, Medicare Advanced Payments, PPP loans and other mechanisms, federal agencies provided substantial liquidity, in some cases with strings attached. Join the panelists as they delve into the effects these funds might have had on fraud and abuse in the health care space.

American Bankruptcy Institute

$75

Add to Cart
Card image cap
-1
63 minutes
cc
Why Didn't Somebody Do Something? Part 2: Involuntary Civil Commitment
If a person can be proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt of a crime, then the criminal-justice system can(doesn’t mean it will) get that person off the streets, at least temporarily, but… What happens when such a person has served his/her sentence, yet we identify that person (hopefully correctly) as still dangerous?… Or, what if we identify a person (hopefully correctly) as dangerous, but that person has not been convicted of a crime? What can the mental-health “system” do? – i.e., what are the legal requirements for short-and long-term involuntary civil commitment?">If a person can be proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt of a crime, then the criminal-justice system can(doesn’t mean it will) get that person off the streets, at least temporarily, but… What happens when such a person has served his/her sentence, yet we identify that person (hopefully correctly) as still dangerous?… Or, what if we identify a person (hopefully correctly) as dangerous, but that person has not been convicted of a crime? What can the mental-health “system” do? – i.e., what are the legal requirements for short-and long-term involuntary civil commitment?

Dr. Brian Russell

$75

Add to Cart
    s