Numerous recent multimillion-dollar settlements underscore the legal threats facing companies that sell commercial goods and services to the federal government. Not only can the government bring suit, but even competitors are now alleging procurement fraud based on violations of contracting requirements unique to the government. Fortunately, companies have ways to mitigate these risks.

The federal government is the largest consumer in the world. To acquire commercial goods and services to meet the government’s needs, the General Services Administration, through its Multiple Award Schedule program, establishes long-term government-wide contracts that contain pre-negotiated prices and terms. Agencies can directly acquire supplies and services using this program, without having to conduct a full-blown acquisition. In fiscal year 2005 alone, the government spent more than $33 billion through these contracts.

This content has been archived. It is available through our partners, LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law.

To view this content, please continue to their sites.

Not a Lexis Advance® Subscriber?
Subscribe Now

Not a Bloomberg Law Subscriber?
Subscribe Now

Why am I seeing this?

LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law are third party online distributors of the broad collection of current and archived versions of ALM's legal news publications. LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law customers are able to access and use ALM's content, including content from the National Law Journal, The American Lawyer, Legaltech News, The New York Law Journal, and Corporate Counsel, as well as other sources of legal information.

For questions call 1-877-256-2472 or contact us at [email protected]