Criminal defense lawyers have long maintained that prosecutors have too much power in the grand jury room. In recent years, much of the public and several members of Congress have come to share that opinion.

Justice Department statistics recently obtained by Legal Times, which reveal that 99.9 percent of the defendants called before federal grand juries are indicted, buttress the belief — and concern — that prosecutors today almost always get what they want from a system originally set up to protect citizens from governmental overreaching.

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