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AGELESS WONDER DICK CLARK SUED FOR AGE BIAS Television mainstay Dick Clark — who’s been rockin’ in the new year forever and shows no sign of letting up — thinks someone his age is too old to work in his production company, according to a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles. Clark, 74, is being sued by Ralph Andrews, who is 76. Andrews claims that, beginning in 2001, he sought a job with Clark but was eventually rebuffed in favor of younger candidates. Andrews, who claims to have known Clark for nearly 40 years, created and produced television shows including “I’ll Bet,” “Liars Club” and “You Don’t Say.” The pair last worked together in 1997, when Clark hosted “It Takes Two,” an updated version of one of Andrews’ game shows that played on the Family Channel. According to Andrews v. Dick Clark Productions, Mosaic Media Group, BC311363, exhibit No. 1 will be a letter Clark wrote to Andrews after the production company stopped returning his phone calls regarding open positions. “It was good to hear from you, Ralph. This is a tough letter to write, I have great respect and admiration for your accomplishments. . . . The last development guy we hired was 27 years old. Another person who is joining our staff next week is 30. People our age are considered dinosaurs. The business is being run by �the next generation,’” the suit quotes Clark as writing. Andrews is represented by the Davis- Maltin Law Firm in Santa Monica. Clark’s production company said it doesn’t comment on litigation. He is represented by Jonathan Fraser Light of Nordman, Cormany, Hair & Compton in Oxnard. Light did not comment either. — Jeff Chorney JUDGES PUT MONEY WHERE MOUTHS WERE The election’s over, and five Santa Clara Superior Court judges, in a last-ditch effort to keep power over the probation department, are out $1,250. Despite opposition from the bench, voters overwhelmingly passed Measure A, which transfers oversight of the probation department from the court to the county. But in a last-minute effort to sway voters, five judges bought a newspaper advertisement and used their own money to do it, according to Registrar of Voters records. Presiding Judge Thomas Hansen contributed $850. Judges Leonard Edwards, Eugene Hyman, Richard Turrone and Socrates “Pete” Manoukian each donated $100 to the cause. Judges usually stay a safe distance away from overt politics. “We did look at the canons,” said Hyman, after the election. He said several judges, including a member of the California Judges Association ethics committee, researched the issue. “The thought process is, this is something we are allowed to comment on,” Hyman said. “This is just another way to educate and comment.” — Shannon Lafferty MANSON FAMILY MEMBER - STAYS LOCKED UP Although a model prisoner for 35 years, former Charles Manson follower Leslie Van Houten’s participation in the horrific 1969 murders of grocers Rosemary and Leno La Bianca seems destined to keep her jailed for life. On March 1, Riverside’s Fourth District Court of Appeal issued a ruling that denies the 54-year-old woman parole for the 12th time. And while the case has been on appeal, the California Board of Prison Terms has denied Van Houten parole twice more. The appeal court ruling reverses a San Bernardino County trial court judge who had ruled that the Board of Prison Terms’ 2000 parole denial for Van Houten wasn’t supported by “some evidence” that continued imprisonment was warranted. The Fourth District said the egregiousness of Van Houten’s crime by itself provided enough evidence to deny parole, without any need to consider her good behavior and participation in rehabilitation for more than three decades. “Van Houten is a public danger in need of further therapy,” Justice Manuel Ramirez wrote in a 43-page published opinion. “Her murders were not as if she had murdered people whom she knew and had given her a once-in-a-lifetime motive to kill,” he continued. “She just went along with the other [Manson] family members to murder whomever they haphazardly picked to sacrifice to their evil apocalyptic fantasies. No one can convincingly say with certainty that, having done that once, she will never do it again.” Justices Art McKinster and Betty Richli concurred. Van Houten, a former homecoming queen and Campfire Girl, was only 19 years old when she, Manson and five other members of the family savagely murdered the La Biancas in their home on Aug. 9, 1969. Van Houten held Mrs. La Bianca down while she was stabbed 42 times. Van Houten wielded the knife 14-16 of those times. The murders — vividly recounted in Vincent Bugliosi’s best-seller “Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders” — came one night after the Manson family, excluding Van Houten, brutally murdered five other people, including actress Sharon Tate Polanski and coffee heiress Abigail Folger. According to the appeal court, Van Houten felt “left out” of the first night’s murderous spree and insisted on coming along to the La Biancas, even bringing extra clothes because she knew she would get covered in blood. “Van Houten,” the court said, “still has not demonstrated an understanding of her responsibility for the heinous character of the crime that she perpetrated.” The ruling is In re Van Houten, 04 C.D.O.S. 1856. — Mike McKee

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