South Africa has been hit by a flood of global law firms seeking lucrative new markets. In 2014 alone, Allen & Overy, Clyde & Co, and Dentons—firms that have a combined global revenue of $4.8 billion—opened offices in South Africa. In 2016, Herbert Smith Freehills and DLA Piper both entered the market, hiring big-name partners from local firms. And this year, Pinsent Masons, a global firm based in the U.K., plans to open its first African office in South Africa.

The legal market in South Africa, once made up of a small group of domestic firms isolated by apartheid, has been transformed into a legal hub, serving as a base for global firms seeking to counsel clients throughout Africa. But as these global firms continue to set up shop in Johannesburg, the well-established domestic firms are adapting so that they, too, can compete for the increasing international business and investment flowing across the continent.

The first wave

This content has been archived. It is available through our partners, LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law.

To view this content, please continue to their sites.

Not a Lexis Advance® Subscriber?
Subscribe Now

Not a Bloomberg Law Subscriber?
Subscribe Now

Why am I seeing this?

LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law are third party online distributors of the broad collection of current and archived versions of ALM's legal news publications. LexisNexis® and Bloomberg Law customers are able to access and use ALM's content, including content from the National Law Journal, The American Lawyer, Legaltech News, The New York Law Journal, and Corporate Counsel, as well as other sources of legal information.

For questions call 1-877-256-2472 or contact us at [email protected]